Best Hybrids 2017

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Best Hybrids 2017: We bring you our top 10 hybrids of 2017 - tried and tested as part of our biggest ever golf club equipment guide, Top Gear.

From the TaylorMade M2 Hybrid to the Ping G and the Callaway Apex hybrid, there is a club designed to help every golfer. But when it comes to hybrids, it's crucial to get the best one for your game.

In our biggest ever equipment test we reviewed hundreds of golf clubs, and when it came to selecting the best hybrids of 2017, these were our top 10 on the market right now.

From the high priced TaylorMade M1 hybrid to the low-budget Benross HTX Compressor, there are plenty of options available when it comes to suiting every type of golfer's needs in 2017. 


TaylorMade M2 Hybrid £189

Lofts: 3/19, 4/22, 5/25, 6/28
Stock Shaft: 
TM REAX
Adjustable Hosel: No 
 

Tech:

The M2 is TaylorMade’s first rescue to feature a two-tone crown to match the M family metal woods. A longer more flexible speed pocket in the sole offers speed and forgiveness particularly on shots struck low on the face. A new sole design, fluted hosel and TaylorMade’s geometry and acoustic engineering optimizes sound and feel. 

TaylorMade M2 Hybrid

Our verdict:

For us TaylorMade’s new M1 and M2 hybrid product line seriously simplifies their offering for consumers this year. And the choice between the two hybrids highlights brilliantly which type of golfer each range is aimed at. Our test pro like a lot of good players has a tendency to pull wider body hybrids left of the target, so the TaylorMade M2 hybrid wouldn’t be his preferred choice.

In our eyes M2’s more forgiving and thanks to all the tech and hours of R&D that’s been poured into its design it performed brilliantly. A ball speed 2mph quicker and 8 yards further than the test average, is very impressive. 

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our TaylorMade M2 Rescue review below 

Bottom line:

We really like how TaylorMade have used the white/black cosmetics on the TaylorMade M2 hybrid’s crown so the head matches the driver and fairway. It’s lighter weight shaft (65g compared to the TaylorMade M1’s 80g regular flex) means it’s a bit of a speed machine. Its responsive, forgiving and easy, to launch from the tee, fairway, rough and even a fairway bunker. The question with 4 available lofts is how many long irons should you be replacing? 


Ping G Hybrid: £180

Lofts: 2/17, 3/19, 4/22, 5/26, 6/30
Stock Shaft:
Alta 70, Tour 90 TFC 80H
Adjustable Hosel: No  

Tech:

The Ping G is the first of their hybrids to have “Turbulators” on the crown, which Ping say not only improves aerodynamics but also aids alignment and focus. A thinned out crown means more weight is positioned to improve MOI, while a new carpenter steel face and tiered sole help optimize face flex to increase ball speeds.

Ping G Hybrid

Our verdict:

We can’t say the Ping G hybrid's “Turbulators” helped raise our club speeds to new levels but we’re happy to agree they cleverly helped direct focus onto the ball at address. The Ping G’s real strength is its consistency, and with just 7 yards of carry distance drop off between middle and off centre hits (for Chris Ryan) its got to be said the wide and long head is really stable and efficient.

Ping’s new counter weighted Alta shaft flighted shots higher than average for each tester and span a little more too, meaning the Ping G hybrid would be particularly good for hitting accurate approaches into greens, as the decent is steeper and spin was above average too.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Ping G Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

The Ping G’s wider body is particularly suited to golfers who sweep shots off the deck. We didn’t all love the unconventional groove pattern but we could agree it’s exceptionally easy to hit consistently well. 


TaylorMade M1 Hybrid: £239

Lofts: 2/17, 3/19, 4/21, 5/24
Stock Shaft:
Mitsubishi Kuro Kage TiNi 70HY
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
How much loft change: +/- 1.5 degrees

Tech:

The M1 rescue is TaylorMade’s first ever sliding weight track rescue club, and it has a 27g sliding weight can be positioned to create a draw, fade or neutral bias. 3 degrees of loft adjustability through the hosel adaptor means it’s possible to dial in lofts and gapping to further suit your own game, while an open channel speed pocket improves ball speeds from a larger portion of the club face.  

TaylorMade M1 hybrid

Our verdict:

For decent players selecting a hybrid is much more about gapping between a fairway wood and their irons, so distance is less of a consideration. That said the TaylorMade M1 was virtually inseparable from the other premium (Callaway Apex) narrow body hybrid in our test. Being the only adjustable weight hybrid it does offer shot shaping capabilities which you won’t get with others, which we reckon is particularly useful if you’ve got specific shot bias set up’s in your driver and fairway woods.

With the sliding weight positioned neutrally there’s a lot of mass at the back of the head which created more spin than Callaway’s Apex hybrid which could help flight the TaylorMade M1 hybrid better for some golfers.  

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our TaylorMade M1 rescue review below 

Bottom line:

It wasn’t that long ago TaylorMade snapped up Adams Golf and their hybrid shaping’s clearly made the transition. For us TaylorMade M1 rescues are for golfers that either hit down on their hybrids (like irons) or have a tendency to pull hybrids left of the target. Make no mistake M1 is expensive, but it gives a level of flexibility decent golfers have come to expect.  


Callaway Apex Hybrid: £189

Lofts: 2H/18, 3H/20, 4H/23, 5H/26
Stock Shaft: Kuro Kage Black Hybrid
Adjustable Hosel: No 

The Tech:

Callaway say the design of their Apex hybrid appeals to better players and tour pro’s. A longer blade length means they transition smoothly from a set of irons, while a neutral CG bias provides workability and control that better players desire. A forged cup face and internal standing wave bring hot face tech to the party.

Callaway Apex hybrid

Our verdict:

Comparing the Apex to Callaway’s wide-bodied XR OS hybrid is like comparing apples to oranges, but it highlights perfectly how different both designs are and how important it is to make the right choice. Where wider body hybrids want to spin more and go up in the air the Apex is intent on powering shots forward.

Shots launched off the face lower, and reached a peak height that was the joint lowest on test. With the same loft as many the Callaway Apex hybrid with its internal weighting and general design flights shots in a completely different way, but still managed to carry shots further than the average hybrid in our test.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Callaway Apex Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

We reckon the Callaway Apex hybrid’s penetrating flight is well suited to a strong performance off the tee. To get the max out of it from the fairway you best not have any difficulty flighting shots from the short grass.


Callaway XR OS Hybrid: £149

Lofts: 3/19, 4/22, 5/25, 6/28, 7/31
Stock Shaft: 
Mitsubishi Fubuki AT
Adjustable Hosel: No

The Tech:

The Callaway XR OS hybrid has been designed for extreme forgiveness, high launch, maximum ball speeds and distance. A forged hyper cup face helps maintain high ball speeds no matter where you hit shots on the face. A wider head shape raises MOI performance whilst also boosting confidence. 

Callaway XR 0S hybrid

Our verdict:

How many times have we been told wider body clubs improve MOI and ball speed performance? Well the data we collected with the Callaway XR OS hybrid completely backs up the theory. It’s a wider head and Callaway don’t shy away from it, and thanks to it the OS protected ball speed alongside the very best on test.

The impressive performance didn’t end there either. It was one of the highest launching and flying hybrids which means excellent drop and stop capability on the greens. It was only out done by a handful of yards for top spot when it came to carry distance. 

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Callaway XR OS Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

An excellent hybrid that delivers the extra ball speed and distance that the majority of golfers need at the top end of their bags. Our test pro thought 80% of golfers would be better off with a wide body hybrid like the Callaway XR OS hybrid compared to a narrower bodied alternative.


Mizuno JPX 900 Hybrid: £219

Lofts: 16, 19, 22, 25
Stock Shaft: 
Fujikura Pro
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
How much loft change: +/- 2 degrees

Tech:

The Mizuno JPX 900 is Mizuno’s first adjustable hybrid. A new profile means the head is made like a wood but plays like an iron and is perfect for golfers who have a tendency to pull hybrids left. A shockwave sole locates mass low in the head and its ability to expand and contract at impact creates more energy than a typical hybrid. The adjustable hosel allows up to 4deg of loft change so you can tailor gapping to your own game.

Mizuno JPX 900 hybrid

Our verdict:

If you saw Top Gear 2016 you might have spotted how Mizuno’s woods didn’t feature too heavily amongst our favourites.  And that’s because we thought the EZ range was pretty difficult to heartily recommend. That’s all changed this year as the JPX 900 is simply fantastic, and according to our test pro some of the best woods Mizuno’s ever made.

Yes the Mizuno JPX 900 hybrid is costly but the attention to the smallest details is spot on. We love how the crowns painted finish ends a couple of millimetres back from the top edge making the face look bigger, easier to hit and naturally inspiring confidence. It’s long blade length and compact mid-wide body felt solid and responsive even if it wasn’t quite the very longest on test.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Mizuno JPX 900 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

Across our three man test we reckoned the Mizuno JPX 900 hybrid was a pleasure to hit. With three lofts and the ability to tune the loft up or down by 2deg means the 900 can be fitted into virtually any golfers set.  


Cobra King F7 Hybrid: £159

Lofts: 2-3/16-19, 3-4/19-22, 4-5/22-25
Stock Shaft: 
Fujikura Pro 75
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
How much loft change: 3 degrees (with three draw settings)

Tech:

Refined shaping of the sole Baffler rails improves turf interaction for the Cobra King F7 hybrid say Cobra, giving consistency from any lie. A single fixed sole weight is positioned to deliver a towering ball flight with a perfect blend of distance and forgiveness. A lighter, thinner 455 steel face increases face flex for maximum ball speeds on off centre hits.  

Cobra King F7 Hybrid

Our verdict:

If you’re ever going to get the best out of your hybrids they’ve got to be versatile and offer the opportunity to escape from all sorts of situations. And that’s where the Cobra King F7 hybrid scores stacks of brownie points.

It’s railed sole means only a tiny portion of the bottom of the club is in contact with the turf so we reckon like us other golfers will fancy their chances of hitting the cute little F7 not only from the tee, fairway and rough but also skidding it out of fairway bunkers too.

Our data proves the F7 performed for all three testers, delivering a ball speed 3mph quicker and 5 yards further than the test average.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Cobra King F7 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

The Cobra King F7 is a gorgeous little hybrid and its versatility is only boosted by the ability to dial in three lofts (with draw settings) from the hosel adaptor. The only niggle raised by 2 testers was how the funky face groove pattern distracted the eye at address. If you’re not as fussy as our testers you might not even notice.  


Srixon Z H65 Hybrid: £190

Lofts: 2/16, 3/19, 4,22
Stock Shaft: 
Miyazaki Kaula Hybrid 7
Adjustable Hosel: No

Tech:

Srixon’s engineers have specifically studied how golfers launch hybrids into the air and come up with “optimized CG locations” for the Srixon Z H65 hybrid. Lower and deeper CG’s in the lower lofts promote higher initial launch, while more rounded soles in the higher lofts promote extra shot versatility from any lie. A new “arc support channel” on the crown gets deeper by loft to promote higher launch and optimal spin.

Srixon Z H65 Hybrid

Our verdict:

Our Top Gear test has threw up just how different hybrids really can be, but what about if you want a hybrid that brings everything together in a single model? That’s where the Srixon Z H65 enters the conversation, as it’s a real blend of a mid-wide body performance with the lower spin characteristics of a much narrower head.

Our test pro loved the feel of the Srixon Z H65 hybrid and by carrying all his test shots to within 4 yards of each other we have to say it’s pretty accurate and consistent too. Chris Jones posted his joint longest carry distance average (with the Callaway XR OS) with the H65 which has to say it’s a blend that can work in the club golfers hands as well.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Srixon Z H65 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

Srixon aren’t renowned for their wood designs yet and with the Srixon Z H65 hybrid weighing in at a hefty £190 a pop its unlikely to change with this model. But if your game means you like the look of a wider body hybrid, but you’d benefit from lowering spin, so shots are less likely to “pop up” into the air the Srixon H65 offers a great solution.

For us it’s the only hybrid that successfully brings together the good traits from both narrow and wide body camps in a single model.


Wilson Staff D300 Hybrid: £139

Lofts: 17, 19, 22, 25
Stock Shaft: 
Matrix Speed Rulz A-Type
Adjustable Hosel: No

Tech:

A progressive head design on the Wilson Staff D300 hybrid means the higher lofts have smaller heads so you get maximum forgiveness in the longer shafted lower lofts. Micro vortex generators on the crown reduce drag and improve aerodynamics so you generate maximum carry on every shot.

Wilson Staff D300 Hybrid

Our verdict:

The Wilson Staff D300 hybrid is a book you really shouldn’t judge by its cover. It’s tiny but wide head looks more like a little fairway wood than hybrid, and initially we thought the size could zap confidence from the vey golfers its designed to help. Yet the results it produced were remarkable. Our test pro thought it was the best Wilson club he’d hit throughout the whole of our Top Gear tests.

The Wilson Staff D300 hybrid’s shaft weighs in at just 54g. It’s 28g lighter than some of the competition and much closer to the weight of a standard driver shaft. We felt it gave a really positive responsive feel and meant the D300 racked up a carry distance 3 yards further than the test average.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Wilson Staff D300 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

Unlike drivers, golfers are much less likely to buy a hybrid because it generates a few more yards - so your criteria for buying hybrids should be different. If your criteria shortlist includes easy to launch, forgiveness, good distance and ball speed protection then the Wilson Staff D300 hybrid is difficult to beat.


Benross HTX Compressor Hybrid: £89

Lofts: 3/20, 4/23.5, 5/27, 6/32
Stock Shaft: 
Kuro Kage Black 70g
Adjustable Hosel: No

Tech:

Featuring the same Compressor Technology Response Channel as the Benross HTX Compressor and HTX Compressor Type R fairway woods, the HTX Compressor hybrid offers exceptional performance from even the worst lies. The rearward CG position promotes a high launch and helps to maximise stability at impact. 

 

Benross HTX Compressor Hybrid

Our verdict:

With the average cost of a hybrid within our test working out at £153.86, the Benross HTX Compressor represents excellent value for money. It’s a fantastic head shape and great blend of wide body forgiveness all wrapped up in a shell that for lots of club golfers will be a confidence inspiring size.

For two testers though it was the highest spinning hybrid on test, and that spin robbed the HTX Compressor of some value yards of carry distance. In the real world it’s not realistic to expect a club less than half the cost of one of the longest on test to compete. On which basis it should be no surprise the HTX Compressor posted a 4mph slower ball speed and a carry distance 14 yards short of the test average.

Bottom line:

Benross have made some quality golf gear over the years and the Benross HTX Compresor hybrid is still a very good option for club golfers considering the cost. The shaft and grip are great quality, but with major brands spending much more on R&D there seems to be a bit of a gap opening up between premium tour brands and the smaller competition.

To read the rest of our 2017 Hybrid reviews, visit our Top Gear Test Page