Rangefinder Guide

Published:

As good as GPS is, it doesn't give you exact yardages to the pin. So unless you want to faff about positioning a pin manually, having a laser rangefinder can be a god send. Confident players often go for a laser to get those precise distances. If you play lots of different courses, or hit lots of shots when you can't see the flag, a GPS is probably better. Here's three of our favourite laser rangefinders currently on the market.

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Rangefinder Guide

Bushnell Tour V4 £269 (Tour V4 Slope £309)

Lots of tour caddies use Bushnell. You can zap anything from five to 1000 yards and be accurate to within a yard. The Slope version adds elevation changes (which can be disabled for tournament play). Both are water resistant and come with a two-year warranty.

 

Rangefinder Guide

GolfBuddy LR5 £219.99

If all you need is an accurate number to a visible hazard or a flag, this is all you need. It’s accurate to within a yard, has three targeting modes to show you distances to different targets and an automatic 10-second shut off, so you don’t waste any battery even if you put it away switched on.

 

Rangefinder Guide

Nikon Golf Coolshot 20 £189

The Coolshot is a seriously compact rangefinder and weighs in at just 125g. A “First Target Priority” mode is really useful when zapping flagsticks against a cluttered backdrop.  A battery condition display means you never need run out of juice during a round.