Which Mizuno iron suits me?

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Which Mizuno irons should I buy? Your guide to each iron in Mizuno's line-up, and who they are aimed at

Most major brands have five, six or even seven irons in their 2019 line-ups, which shows the importance of having solutions for all golfers, irrespective of ability or personal preference. Choices range from slimline musclebacks to hollow heads and cavity backs, and while some are forged, others have springy faces just like a driver.  

So with such a huge amount of choice out there, we felt it was far too easy for golfers to get confused about which model best suits them. Even golfers who have a good idea of which iron suits them probably don’t realise what they put on the line in terms of ball speed, carry and forgiveness by choosing a set above their station.

So as 2019’s irons hit pro shop shelves, we felt the time was right to show how a brand’s whole iron range compares against each other.

As well as launch monitor data from our pro, we’ve given every iron a forgiveness rating and a handicap guide to spell out simply what sort of players should be considering what sort of models, and why.

ROBOT TESTED: Which golf ball suits my game?

Mizuno MP-18 MB iron

7-iron specs:

Loft: 34°; Offset: 2.3mm; One-piece forged 1025E HD mild carbon steel construction

Iron forgiveness rating

Mizuno MP-18 MB iron

The numbers:

Ball Speed: 117.9 MPH Launch Angle: 20.8° Backspin: 6259 RPM Peak Height: 37 Yards Descent Angle: 50° Carry Distance: 164 Yards

Who are they for?

MP irons are Mizuno’s forte, they’re what the company is famous for in golf. There can’t be a serious player in the world that hasn’t picked up an MP iron over the years and wished they were good enough to play them.

Nick Faldo won six Majors with his; Sandy Lyle was a massive fan and Paul Casey and Luke Donald are still playing them today. What’s the takeaway? All these players are  brilliant ball strikers, and that’s where the MP-18 irons belong. In the hands of golfers who genuinely do strike their irons amazingly well, and aren’t afraid to pull a muscleback mid and long iron from their bag.

If you really are good enough to play a set your game will demand shaping and working approaches on to ledges or shelves of greens, which really is less than 1% of golfers.

Which TaylorMade iron suits me?

Foresight GC Quad

Why we use a Foresight CG Quad launch monitor

Mizuno JPX919 Tour iron

7-iron specs:

Loft: 34°; Offset: 2.9mm; One-piece forged 1025E HD mild carbon steel construction

Iron forgiveness rating

Mizuno JPX919 Tour iron

The numbers:

Ball Speed: 120.8 MPH Launch Angle: 20.6° Backspin: 6616 RPM Peak Height: 38 Yards Descent Angle: 51° Carry Distance: 167 Yards

Who are they for?

The JPX Tour irons (including last year’s 900s) have been a massive hit on Tour over the last few years – World No.2 Brooks Koepka even plays them unpaid, and he’s won three Majors with his.

We see JPX919 Tour very much as THE modern blade. It combines a lovely, compact head shape which golfers expect from a traditional muscleback, with an added degree of stability and perimeter weighting thanks to a very small cavity back. It means tighter distance dispersion (over a muscleback), which makes for some accurate shot-making as long as you’re a well above average ball striker.

For club golfers we’d say if distance or forgiveness comes onto your radar with irons, then like Sir Nick Faldo you really should be looking towards the JPX919 Forged or Hot Metal Pros instead.

TESTED: Blade vs Cavity irons with Sir Nick Faldo

Mizuno iron testing

Mizuno MP-18 SC iron

7-iron specs:

Loft: 34°; Offset: 2.3mm; One-piece forged 1025E HD mild carbon steel construction

Iron forgiveness rating

Mizuno MP-18 SC iron

The numbers:

Ball Speed: 120.4 MPH Launch Angle: 19.7° Backspin: 6480 RPM Peak Height: 36 Yards Descent Angle: 49° Carry Distance: 167 Yards

Who are they for?

At first glance Mizuno’s iron line-up might appear at least a little confusing, with lots of overlaps between models. But you’ve got to understand the brains behind the range see the MP line-up being aimed at very different golfers to the JPX.

Mizuno says MP are much more traditional (with shiny, polished finishes) and likely to suit the eyes of golfers who’ve grown up playing Mizuno irons. Whereas JPX have a much more modern look with satin finishes, more game enhancing technology and are likely to attract the attention of younger players who might not have played Mizuno before.

See MP-18 SC as a players’ cavity back and you won’t go far wrong. Come August 2019 the SCs have been part of the Mizuno family for two years, which means it’s highly likely they’ll be replaced by a newer model.

Which Callaway iron suits me? 

Find out more in our video compaison below

MP-18 MB vs JPX919 Tour vs MP-18 SC vs MP-18 MMC vs JPX919 Forged vs JPX919 Hot Metal Pro vs JPX919 Hot Metal

Mizuno MP-18 MMC iron

7-iron specs:

Loft: 32°; Offset: 3.3mm; One-piece forged 1025E HD mild carbon steel construction

Iron forgiveness rating

Mizuno MP-18 MMC iron

The numbers:

Ball Speed: 121.8 MPH Launch Angle: 19° Backspin: 5624 RPM Peak Height: 36 Yards Descent Angle: 48° Carry Distance: 174 Yards

Who are they for?

A great MP iron that thanks to tungsten weighting and a titanium cavity badge is playable probably up to about a 12 handicap.

MMC brings to the table a forged feel that golfers expect from Mizuno without chasing ball speed through ridiculously low lofts or any real fast face technology, and to some golfers that means more consistency.

MMC has a 3mm shorter blade length than the JPX919 Forged and 4mm shorter than the Hot Metal Pro, which will be a factor for those insistent on using compact irons. Even with a loft 2° stronger than the JPX919 Tour and MP-18 MB, the MMC can still launch, spin, peak out and land shots at very similar rates, so don’t feel approaches won’t stop on a green.

Which Wilson iron suits me?

At a glance comparison

Mizuno iron comparison

Mizuno JPX919 Forged iron

7-iron specs:

Loft: 32°; Offset: 3.4mm; One piece forged 1025 HD (with boron trace) mild carbon steel construction

Iron forgiveness rating

Mizuno JPX919 Forged iron

The numbers:

Ball Speed: 121.7 MPH Launch Angle: 19° Backspin: 5793 RPM Peak Height: 36 Yards Descent Angle: 49° Carry Distance: 173 Yards

Who are they for?

Sir Nick Faldo might have a set in his bag, but the Forged would be just as at home in a serious 14 handicapper’s bag, too.

Lots of golfers will find themselves faced with a choice between the JPX919 Forged, MP-18 MMC and JPX 919 Hot Metal Pro, as all three cover an area of the market where lots of golfers start thinking about buying Mizuno irons.

If you need help deciding between them, let us offer some simple rules. MP-18 MMC are players’ irons, and by that we mean reasonably consistent ball strikers. The JPX919 Forged are for a huge audience, especially golfers who welcome a dose of extra ball speed and carry, but don’t want to give up a forged sound and feel to get it. Hot Metal Pro chases ball speed with a cup face and a slightly bigger head, and you give up a forged head to get it.

Which Ping iron suits me?

How do they compare - Handicap Guide

Brands hate giving an indication of which handicap of golfer each iron typically suits, as it pigeon-holes their models. We've given each a handicap guide below to help ensure you buy the set most suited to your ability.  

Mizuno iron comparison

Mizuno JPX919 Hot Metal Pro iron

7-iron specs:

Loft: 30°; Offset: 3.1mm; One-piece cast 4140M chromoly steel construction

Iron forgiveness rating

Mizuno JPX919 Hot Metal Pro iron

The numbers:

Ball Speed: 124.9 MPH Launch Angle: 18.9° Backspin: 5706 RPM Peak Height: 38 Yards Descent Angle: 49° Carry Distance: 178 Yards

Who are they for?

Mizuno say they introduced the Hot Metal Pro because they saw a lot of decent golfers turning to the JPX919 Hot Metal iron, because of the extra performance benefits it brings to the table. Mizuno knew they could attract more eyes with a slimmed down profile and less hosel offset, as the model would become more attractive to better players.

Hot Metal Pro was our test pro’s strongest Mizuno performer, with a very solid spread of ball speed, backspin, peak height, descent angle and carry distance numbers, which for us makes it a brilliant all-rounder. Just remember it’s not forged, hence why it costs less than Mizuno’s forged models. In a blind test, though, we reckon many golfers at this ability level would struggle to hear or feel much difference.

Mizuno JPX919 Hot Metal iron

7-iron specs:

Loft: 30°; Offset: 4.5mm; One-piece cast 4140M chromoly steel construction

Iron forgiveness rating

Mizuno JPX919 Hot Metal iron

The numbers:

Ball Speed: 123.4 MPH Launch Angle: 19.5° Backspin: 6005 RPM Peak Height: 38 Yards Descent Angle: 50° Carry Distance: 174 Yards

Who are they for?

Mizuno’s most game improver iron. A deep cavity back, with excellent perimeter weighting, offers good off-centre hit forgiveness, along with a decent sound and feel.

Expect Mizuno’s longest iron blade length and thickest top edge along with the most amount of hosel offset, but compared to some max game improvement irons, Hot Metal is a beauty to look at.

If your decision for switching irons is based on gaining ball speed and distance, it’s worth remembering that even as a distance iron the Hot Metal’s 7-iron loft is three degrees weaker than Callaway’s strongest Rogue X  model. It’s also 1.5° weaker than TaylorMade’s M6 and 0.5° down on Ping’s G700, which will obviously affect launch monitor numbers if you test them all head-to-head. Worth bearing in mind.

How they compare in data

Mizuno iron data