2012

  • Pause your swing to improve ball striking

    Written by Gareth Johnston on Monday, 31 December 2012

    In this video TG Elite Teaching Professional Gareth Johnston gives you a drill to stop you trying to hit the ball from the top, that causes a loss of angle and power. By following his tips you can gain more power where it matters, at the point of impact.   This video was shot on location at the Buenavista Golf Club in Tenerife. The...

  • Use your nose to improve your ball striking

    Written by Gareth Johnston on Monday, 24 December 2012

    In this video TG Elite Teaching Professional Gareth Johnston gives you an easy drill to optimise your impact conditions. By lining the centre of your body up with the ball you can stop your clubhead attacking the back of the ball to steeply, leading to fats, or too shallowly, leading to thins. In this video Gareth teaches you how to get it...

  • Understand your shoulder turn

    Written by Gareth Johnston on Thursday, 13 December 2012

    In this video TG Elite Teaching Professional Gareth Johnston shows you a simple tip that will help you improve your shoulder turn. He starts by kneeling, this removes his lower body action from the equation. When you swing from here you'll realise your own limitations. You can then swing within yourself for more control and accuracy. This video was shot on location at...

  • Use a towel to improve your weight transition

    Written by Gareth Johnston on Thursday, 6 December 2012

    In this video TG Elite Teaching Professional Gareth Johnston teaches you how to crunch your irons with a simple drill to try at home and all you will need is a towel. The aim of the drill is to get your weight on your left side when you get to the top of your backswing. This then aids you in finding the right position to...

  • Control your clubface

    Written by Gareth Johnston on Thursday, 29 November 2012

    In this instruction video TG Elite Teaching Professional Gareth Johnston takes you through a simple drill to help control your hand action through impact. All you need is a cane, that you can fix to the butt of your grip. You can then rest it against your hip at address and keep the cane there while you make a short swing. This...

  • Create the correct spine angle for longer drives

    Written by Gareth Johnston on Wednesday, 21 November 2012

    In this video TG Elite Pro Gareth Johnston takes you through how to create the correct spine angle to optimise your swing. All you need to try this at home in-front of a mirror, or on the range, is a club or training cane. The aim is to create a 90 degree angle between your spine and your driver's shaft angle at...

  • Get on plane with this simple forearm drill

    Written by Gareth Johnston on Friday, 9 November 2012

    In this video TG Elite Teaching Pro Gareth Johnston takes you through a great practise drill to get your swing on plane for better ball striking and power. His drill is centred on making sure your forearms are in the correct position at the top; this stops you getting too steep and too shallow in your downswing.

  • Matchplay - Swing easy on par threes

    Written by Scott Cranfield on Friday, 21 September 2012

    Getting the club right on par threes and hitting the green is vital in matchplay to put pressure on your opponent. One way you can gain the upper hand is to take an extra club or two and swing it easy. This does two things. Firstly, it gives you a bit more control over the clubface and secondly, it deceives your...

  • Roll your right foot for greater consistency

    Written by Chris Ryan on Friday, 10 August 2012

    To get the correct feeling of the way the legs work in the downswing, TG Elite Pro has devised a simple swing thought showcased in this golf video tip. Roll, then lift. It’s that simple. When the right foot moves in this way, it ensures the weight is in the left side and prevents a loss of posture at impact. It’s...

  • Find your rhythm

    Written by Adrian Fryer on Wednesday, 1 August 2012

    Many teaching professionals preach that a slow and steady rhythm is the key behind finding the holy grail of consistency. But our Elite Pro Adrian Fryer believes that finding your tempo will unlock your true potential. During his years of experience he has noticed that not all the top pros swing with the same rhythm and tempo. Some like...

  • Reduce the dispersion of your shots

    Written by Kevin Flynn on Friday, 13 July 2012

    The key to reducing the dispersion of your shots is to minimize the rotation of the clubface through the hitting area. You can do this by thinking about the position the arms take as the club is delivered into the ball. Copy the positions highlighted by Kevin Flynn in this golf video tip and you’ll do just that.

  • Stack & Tilt® Fundamental 3: Control the ball’s direction and curve

    Written by James Ridyard on Monday, 9 July 2012

    This comes down to understanding the effect the clubface and path have on the ball’s flight and knowing how to adjust it. Under the new ball flight laws proved  by Launch Monitor data, the clubface predominantly controls the initial direction and the club path controls the curve. Being able to control your low point also gives control over path. Then, all...

  • Stack & Tilt® Fundamental 2: Hit the ball far enough for your course

    Written by James Ridyard on Monday, 9 July 2012

    Club golfers need to be able to hit the ball far enough to reach all the holes in the regulation number of shots. The longest hitters in the game – Phil Mickelson, Bubba Watson etc – turn their hips a lot in the backswing to do this. This move allows the hands to travel inwards at the start of the swing,...

  • Stack & Tilt® Fundamental 1: Hit the ground after the ball

    Written by James Ridyard on Friday, 6 July 2012

    It’s a revolutionary swing model that the inventors, American pros Mike Bennett and Andy Plummer claim is ‘remaking golf’. But what’s it all about and could it work for your game? The biggest difference between club and Tour players is their ability to strike the golf ball purely. You can measure this by noting where the club hits the ground. The...

  • Break 80: We want drag, not drop

    Written by Adrian Fryer on Tuesday, 1 May 2012

    The better player has learned the downswing begins from the ground up. However the muscles in the thighs and hips are strong; it’s easy to drive them too hard, causing the club to drop inside and lag behind. Sensing a block the player releases hard, creating a hook. To solve this problem, we need to get out of...

  • Break 90: Sync your armswing and body turn

    Written by Adrian Fryer on Tuesday, 1 May 2012

    The 100-breaker’s typical fault is to start down too aggressively with his upper half; the 80-breaker tends to over-use the lower half. The 90-breaker could adopt either of these errors. His best strategy is a neutral approach, a square face delivered straight down the line. For this he needs to set the face at address appropriately and develop...

  • Break 100: Set the clubface shut

    Written by Adrian Fryer on Tuesday, 1 May 2012

    Clubface aim and swingpath are linked… and often in the form of a vicious circle. As the face opens, the right-handed golfer hits further left to allow for it; and the further left he hits, the more he opens the face. This relationship causes problems both for the high-handicap club player, who tends to start down with his...

  • What are one and two plane golf swings?

    Written by Kevin Flynn on Friday, 6 January 2012

    There’s been a lot of talk in magazines and online about one and two plane swings, which pros swing with which and what they are exactly. If you’re still puzzled, this golf video tip from Plane Truth instructor Kevin Flynn highlights the key differences between the two as well as the pros and cons of each.

  • One plane: A more stable release

    Written by Kevin Flynn on Friday, 6 January 2012

    A one-plane swing is preferable over a two-plane swing because the clubface goes through much less rotation through the hitting area. In this golf video tip, Plane Truth instructor Kevin Flynn demonstrates a drill with a cane that highlights the benefits of swinging in this manner.

  • Four-foot zone checkpoint

    Written by Kevin Flynn on Friday, 6 January 2012

    In a one plane golf swing, the arm plane matches the shoulder plane at the top of the backswing. But rather than turning correctly in the backswing, many one-plane golfers lift out of their spine angle, which causes problems with strike and accuracy. This simple checkpoint from Plane Truth instructor Kevin Flynn will help you turn while maintaining your posture for...