81 - 90

Welcome to the most prestigious and most definitive ranking of the best golf courses in Great Britain and Ireland.

  

81 Rosapenna Sandy Hills

Golf was first played here in 1891 and the Old Tom Morris is still a very enjoyable, traditional links – but it is the Pat Ruddy-designed Sandy Hills which is the blockbuster at Rosapenna.

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82 Worplesdon

An exquisite heathland cut between chestnut and pine trees. The short holes are particularly memorable – the 10th a fine hole over water and the 13th a downhill, well-bunkered challenge.

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83 Southerness

A brilliant, typically Scottish links which would be even more highly regarded if it was in Fife.

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84 Aberdovey

This is where Ian Woosnam learnt the game and it is a classic out-and-back links which is wedged between the Cambrian mountains and the sea.

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85 Lough Erne

Nick Faldo’s first course in Ireland was commissioned by supermarket mogul and golf fan Jim Treacy. It is a spectacular layout, and Faldo’s passion and commitment to course design cannot be questioned.

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86 Chart Hills

Nick Faldo’s first step into design will always be remembered for the bunkers. As it happens, not only did the six-time Major champion merely do the fine tuning at Chart Hills – American Steve Smyers did much of the work – the bunkers are a bit of a red herring.

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87 Broadstone

One of many Top 100 entries for Harry Colt, who was asked to modify Broadstone using a typically terrific stretch of heathland which lies to the west of the railway line.

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88 The Addington

Probably the most quirky inland course in this list: deep chasms traversed by thin wooden bridges, exceptionally tight fairways and acute dog-legs.

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89 Royal Ashdown Forest

One of the 25 courses listed in our first ranking in 1982, it has never slipped from the league. Remarkably the course has not a single bunker on it – but that doesn’t mean it is easy.

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90 New Zealand

Although under 6,000 yards long, its par of 68 ensures a round here isn’t littered with birdies and tap-in pars. Designed in 1895 by Samuel Fergusson, who was also both founder and then secretary, the course has six two-shotters over 400 yards.

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