Best Hybrids 2018

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Best Hybrids 2018: We bring you our top 10 hybrids of 2017 - tried and tested as part of our biggest ever golf club equipment guide, Top Gear. For best hybrids 2017, click here.

From the Ping G400 Hybrid to the Callaway Rogue and the TaylorMade M4 hybrid, there is a club designed to help every golfer. But when it comes to hybrids, it's crucial to get the best one for your game.

In our biggest ever equipment test we reviewed hundreds of golf clubs, and when it came to selecting the best hybrids of 2018, these were our top 10 on the market right now.

From the high priced Titleist 818 H1 hybrid to the lower-budget Cobra F-Max, there are plenty of options available when it comes to suiting every type of golfer's needs in 2018. 

Find out why these 10 clubs made our top 10 hybrids of 2018

Ping G400 Hybrid - £200

Lofts: #2 - 17° / #3 - 19° / #4 - 22° / #5 - 26° / #6 - 30°  
Stock shaft: Ping Alta CB70 / Ping Tour 85 
Adjustable hosel: No
Body type:  Mid - Wide 

ping g400 hybrid

You need to know:

Ping say the G400 delivers hotter, higher shots with a tighter dispersion. A new maraging steel face is 11% thinner and 10% lighter which Ping reckon delivers a 2mph faster ball speed. Thanks to repositioning mass more efficiently you can expect to peak shots out 5 yards higher, which helps hold a green from distance. The #2 and #3 are more toe weighted to help stop shots from going left in the hands of better players.      

We say:

An absolute cracker of a hybrid, which all three testers would be happy to put in their own bags. The beauty of the G400 lies in its versatility and ability to suit so many different types of player. We’re big fans of the across the board performance which was highlighted when the G400 produced our two amateurs second fastest ball speeds from a slightly weaker loft than the test average. Our test pro loved how the face grooves highlight where you should be impacting shots, and Chris in particular felt able to hit both higher flighted softer landing and lower more penetrating shots for maximum distance. Being able to buy G400 in both a lighter Alta 70 and heavier Tour 85 shaft means all golfers should be able to find their perfect fit and feel.          

Verdict:

A brilliant all-round hybrid option, the matt black finish means the turbulators on the crown fade into the background creating a completely un-offensive head design. A mid-wide head shape is perfect for flighting shots easily from the turf, digging shots out of the rough and scuttling shots out of low lipped fairway bunkers.    

TaylorMade M3 Rescue - £239

Lofts:  #2 – 17deg / #3 – 19deg / #4 – 21deg  / #5 – 24deg
Stock shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Blue 80 / 70 
Adjustable hosel: Yes
How much? +/-1.5 deg 
Body type: Narrow

taylormade m3 rescue

You need to know:

A narrow body hybrid, which thanks to 30g of sliding sole weight can help dial in a neutral or fade shot shape, which is perfect for better players who often find they pull hybrids left of the target. For the first time there’s a two-tone silver and black paintjob to match the M3 woods. An adjustable hosel lets you dial in loft, face angle and lie more accurately than a glued hosel model.

We say:

A typical narrow body hybrid which is well suited to golfers who hit down on their hybrids much  like irons, which tends to be slightly better players with more aggressive swing types. All of our testers erred towards the M4 hybrid much more so than the M3, primarily because of the wider more forgiving head and shallower profile. Comparing the two our test pro saw a gain of 8 yards of carry distance in favour of the M4, which comes from a 2 deg higher launch and goes someway to explaining the difference in flight between the wide body M4 and narrow body M3. We’re fans of the sound and feel which are excellent and the new two-tone paintjob which matches TaylorMade’s fantastic woods.

Verdict:

An excellent choice for fans of narrow body hybrids or decent golfers prone to tugging hybrids left of the target, which isn’t most double digit handicap club golfers. For us anyone choosing M3 should really be making use of the adjustable hosel and sliding sole weight to warrant the extra dosh over the excellent M4.

Callaway Rogue X Hybrid - £229

Lofts: 3H - 18deg / 4H - 20deg / 5H - 23deg / 6H - 26deg /
7H - 29deg / 8H - 32deg
Stock shaft: Aldila Synergy 50 
Adjustable hosel: No 
Body type: Wide 

callaway rogue x hybrid

You need to know:

When you make a seriously strong lofted set of irons there’s a need for matching hybrids to ensure accurate loft gaps at the top end of the bag. The X has a wider head than the standard Rogue hybrid which creates an ultra-low CG and high MOI design. Callaway say even though the X have strong lofts, thanks to some clever tinkering with shapes and shaft weights they’re super easy to launch on a “bombing” trajectory from the turf.  

We say:

It makes sense if you make a strong lofted set of irons you really should have strong lofted hybrids to fit right in alongside them, so Callaway’s thinking is sound. We also love the idea of taking hybrid lofts all the way down to 32deg which is roughly a seven iron, it means fitting hybrids into a set should be simpler than ever before, even if they will set you back a few extra quid. Like everything rogue for 2018 the X is super strong, 20deg was our test sample loft, which is a 4H when it comes to Rogue X. For Simon’s who’s the biggest hybrid fan amongst our testers Rogue X was his longest carrying hybrid (189 yards) on test which is impressive as the X launched and peaked shots out a fraction lower than his test average.

Verdict:

Hybrids, like putters and wedges are fast becoming really personal bits of gear which can be difficult to change, once you’ve found a favourite. While the Rogue X absolutely performed in terms of data for all three testers it’s oversized head wouldn’t be our testers first choice for 2018. If you’re in any doubt whether to go Rogue or Rogue X, we reckon to avoid confusion only go Rogue X if you have a set of matching irons (Rogue X), or have been specifically fitted for them. 

Cleveland Launcher HB Hybrid - £179

Lofts:  #3 - 19° / #4 - 22°/ #5 - 25° 
Stock shaft:  Miyazaki C 
Adjustable hosel: No 
Body type: Narrow - Mid

cleveland launcher hybrid

You need to know:

The whole story with Launcher HB is simple distance with excellent forgiveness. Cleveland reckon by removing all adjustability and simply focusing on speed and playability they’ve hit the jackpot. A HiBore crown lowers and deepens the centre of gravity, Flex-Fins in the sole direct more energy back at the golf ball for excellent distance and speed retention especially on off-centre hits.

We say:

Cleveland promised simple distance with the Launcher and it certainly delivered. It was our test pro’s longest carrying hybrid (229 yards), even though it wasn’t his favourite model. It registered amongst the top 3 hybrids for ball speed and carry distance for our two amateurs too, which shows the Launcher’s credantials. All three testers thought the shaft felt quite long (which in part is down to the tip section being white), which we thought would zap a bit of confidence for a few golfers. The majority of club golfers who want a forgiving hybrid to launch from the turf probably wouldn’t want the long head to be any narrower either. The loud high-pitched impact sound of the original Launcher (due to the body vibrating at impact) has been completely reworked and stiffened to improve acoustics and energy transfer for this latest model.      

Verdict:

Cleveland only came back to the equipment market last year after focusing on wedges and putters for a few years. The Launcher hybrid, like the driver, fairway and irons is a very decent option, for reasonable money. Fitting options are deliberately limited for the whole Launcher family, as Cleveland reckon they’ve optimized each to go from rack to range without the need for fitting. So long as you try them on a launch monitor first and prove they work for you before making a purchase, they’re a very solid choice for 2018.       

Mizuno CLK Hybrid - £245

Lofts:  #2 - 16° / #3 – 19° / #4 - 22° / #5 - 25° 
Stock shaft: Fujikura Speeder Evolution HB
Adjustable hosel: Yes 
How much ?  +/- 2° 
Body type: Mid 

mizuno hybrid

You need to know:

The CLKs wave sole pushes mass low and closer to the face for higher launching, lower spinning shots. An ultra-thin maraging 1770 steel face is fast and forgiving and Mizuno say the CLKs versatile profile sits right between a long iron and fairway wood. An eight position hosel and 4 loft options offer 32 set up options, which should mean everyone can find a solution in the CLK family.       

We say:

Ever since hybrids first became popular their purpose of delivering extra playability and function over long irons has dictated how they’ve come with some pretty funky head shapes. We can’t think of another hybrid like the CLK that we’d describe as being cute. Yes it’s a compact head, which will be intimidating for some, but thanks to the CLKs cheekiness we were drawn into hitting tons of different types of shots, which we reckon adds a good degree of versatility on the golf course. We love how like the Mizuno woods the crown paint line is kept back from the top edge making the face appear bigger than it actually is. CLK produced our test pro’s second fastest ball speed (141 mph tied with the TaylorMade M3) but thanks to some extra back spin (over the test average) it recorded a carry distance just a yard further than the test average.        

Verdict:

A stand out performer. Simon was the biggest fan reckoning the flexibility of the adjustable hosel and cute head open up extra possibilities for club golfers looking to fill specific loft gaps within their own sets.  Like most Mizuno products the CLK comes with a top-notch shaft. The Fujikura Speeder is designed to launch low which we reckon means it’s ideally suited to average and above swing speed golfers, if that’s not you then you really should look at Mizuno’s Fujikura Pro’s mid – high launch option instead.

Cobra F-Max Hybrid - £149

Lofts:  #3 - 19° / #4 - 22° / #5 - 25° / #6 - 28° /#7 -31°
Stock shaft:  Cobra Super Lite 60 
Adjustable hosel: No 
Body type: Wide  

cobra f-max hybrid

You need to know:

Cobra’s lightest and most forgiving hybrid, it’s been specifically designed to perform at moderate swing speeds. A shallow profile and offset hosel promote easy up distance, there’s plenty of draw bias thanks to heel weighting to help keep a slice in check. Larger midsize grips are particularly well suited to golfers of a “certain age”.     

We say:

For us Cobra F-Max is opening up a whole new golf market, by pitching itself at an audience which year on year is growing…seniors. Even at Simon’s smooth swing speed the F-Max was over powered which meant high shots with lots of backspin and not much distance, but experience tells us that’s exactly the characteristics which help shots stay in the air for longer and carry further at below average swing speeds. We just couldn’t hit a four or five iron as high or consistently from the turf as the F-Max and we certainly wouldn’t have as much fun if we tried.       

Verdict:

We love the F-Max concept and whilst tons of golfers won’t want to admit it’s a range beautifully set to help their game, it really is. If you struggle launching a five iron from the deck, do yourself a favour and give the F-Max a try, they really can make the game much more enjoyable.   

Titleist 818 H1 Hybrid - £255

Lofts: 19deg, 21deg, 23deg, 25deg, 27deg
Stock shaft: Mitsubishi Tensei Red / Blue / White, Aldila Rogue MAX,
Project X Even Flow Blue
Adjustable hosel: Yes
How much?  +/- 1deg
Body type: Wide

titleist 818 hybrid

You need to know:

High launch, easy distance and tremendous forgiveness say Titleist.  For golfers who sweep shots off the fairway and prefer the look of a fairway wood. A 2nd generation “Active Recoil Channel” in the sole maximises ball speeds, and a SureFit CG cartridge allows precise CG positioning to optimise spin, trajectory and dispersion. MOI (forgiveness) is 10% higher than Titleist’s previous 816 hybrids.    

We say:

Compared to some of the hybrids on test the H1 is positively minimalistic, as there’s absolutely no graphics or alignment aid on the crown. Some will argue an alignment aid would help ordinary golfers set up correctly and impact shots closer to the centre of the face more often, but two testers really appreciated the simple wide body look. Titleist reckon they’ve done tons of work optimising the H1s Active Recoil Channel tech and we’d agree shots ping off the face feeling lively, generating a lovely impact sensation particularly at average swing speeds. Data wise the H1 put in a solid on average performance across the board for our test pro (who prefers wider body hybrids) and Simon, which says to us it’s well equipped to perform for a wide variety of golfers.  

Verdict:

The most expensive hybrid we tested, which you probably wouldn’t spot from looking at our data alone. If you can warrant spending over £250 on a hybrid, please make sure you get it properly fitted, Titleist offer a fantastic range of premium shafts to tailor performance very much to your own game.  

Cobra King F8 £169

Lofts: 2H/17deg, 3H/19deg, 4H/22deg, 5H/25deg
Stock shaft: Aldila Rogue Pro 75
Adjustable hosel: No
Body type: Mid

cobra king f8 hybrid

You need to know:

Baffler sole tech has been in Cobra’s DNA since the 70’s and this years F8 has variable depth rails (they’re deeper as the lofts get higher) to raise playability particularly from longer grass. Aerodynamic trips on the crown help rinse every last drop of speed from your swing, while an Arccos sensor in the grip works with an app on your phone to monitor where you hit every shot. 

We say:

The F8 split our judges mainly due to the crown cosmetics. But putting subjective looks aside just for a second performance was spot on our test average (ball speed and carry distance) which suggests it’s a solid all-round performer. We like the sole rails which get deeper as loft increases, and both amateur testers liked the F8s new funky aero trips and nardo grey colour, even if our test pro wasn’t a fan. If hitting consistent high launching shots from the turf and tee and rifling shots out of knarly lies in the rough are what you want from a hybrid, the F8 has a CV more than capable of fulfilingl the job description.

Verdict:

At a time when a Ping hybrid will set you back £30 more than the F8, the Cobra has a heck of a lot to offer. Use the shot tracker in the grip to help record successes and failures every time you pull it from the bag and it’s a very impressive package.       

TaylorMade M4 Rescue - £199

Lofts: #3 – 19deg / #4 – 22deg / #5 – 25deg / #6 – 28deg
Stock shaft: Fujikura Atmos Red
Adjustable hosel: No
Body type: Wide

taylormade m4 hybrid

You need to know:

A bigger, wider body than the M3 which is ideal for golfers who tend to sweep hybrid shots off the deck like a fairway wood. The speed pocket sole boosts speed and forgiveness particularly on shots struck low on the face. A new split weight sole design, fluted hosel and TaylorMade’s acoustic engineering optimizes forgiveness, ball speed, sound and feel.  

We say:

It’s ironic the Fujikura Atmos shaft in the M4 driver which wasn’t the best fit for any of our testers (each saw improved results switching to a custom shaft) was actually a great fit for both fairways and hybrids. It probably goes some way to explaining why TaylorMade choose it, especially considering less golfers get fit for fairways and hybrids compared to drivers. M4 and its friendly low profile excelled for our two amateur testers, posting Simon’s second longest carry distance (187 yards, two yards back from the longest) from a ball sped 5 mph slower than his longest Callaway Rogue X. It’s worth pointing out though both amateurs would rather plump for the M4s neater profile for their own bags.   

Verdict:

It may be controversial but we’re going to say it anyway…the M4 hybrid is the wide body hybrid of 2018. It’s a decent step forward in terms of looks and shaping over the old M2. It’s really powerful and for the vast majority of club golfers will out-perform any long iron or narrow body hybrid for forgiveness and all out playability.      

Callaway Rogue Hybrid - £229

Lofts:  2H - 17deg / 3H - 19deg / 4H - 21deg /
5H - 24deg / 6H - 27deg
Stock shaft: Aldila Synergy 60
Adjustable hosel:  No 
Body type:  Wide  

callaway rogue hybrid

You need to know:

Both Rogue and Rogue X are the first hybrids to feature jailbreak tech, and Callaway say to maximize the impact of the tech in a smaller sized hybrid head they’ve increased the face depth. It means every shot gets the full force of the club face loading and rebounding energy back to the golf ball.   

We say:

Callaway Rogue products have featured heavily amongst the longest and fastest drivers, fairways and irons we’ve tested in 2018, so it goes without saying the hybrid’s are just as powerful. It came as no surprise Rogue produced all three testers fastest hybrid ball speeds. But the difference between the other Rogue products we’ve tested which our testers fell over themselves to recommend, is how no tester really wanted to put a Rogue hybrid in their own bag for 2018. Looks are completely subjective, but none of our testers quite fell for the Rogue looks or beauty. Don’t get us wrong on paper they absolutely perform, it’s just the heads are big, wide and as attractively shaped as rain on a bank holiday weekend.

Verdict:

We can’t not recommend Callaway Rogue hybrids as they’re amongst the very best performers within our test. But because they cost a pretty penny, and they’re not adjustable you’re going  to need to love them to warrant the outlay, and for us on this occasion cupid just missed the mark. Looks are entirely subjective so if you can turn a blind eye to the Rogue’s wide body they’ll do you just fine.   


Best Hybrids 2017: We bring you our top 10 hybrids of 2017 - tried and tested as part of our biggest ever golf club equipment guide, Top Gear.

From the TaylorMade M2 Hybrid to the Ping G and the Callaway Apex hybrid, there is a club designed to help every golfer. But when it comes to hybrids, it's crucial to get the best one for your game.

In our biggest ever equipment test we reviewed hundreds of golf clubs, and when it came to selecting the best hybrids of 2017, these were our top 10 on the market right now.

From the high priced TaylorMade M1 hybrid to the low-budget Benross HTX Compressor, there are plenty of options available when it comes to suiting every type of golfer's needs in 2017. 


TaylorMade M2 Hybrid £189

Lofts: 3/19, 4/22, 5/25, 6/28
Stock Shaft: 
TM REAX
Adjustable Hosel: No 
 

Tech:

The M2 is TaylorMade’s first rescue to feature a two-tone crown to match the M family metal woods. A longer more flexible speed pocket in the sole offers speed and forgiveness particularly on shots struck low on the face. A new sole design, fluted hosel and TaylorMade’s geometry and acoustic engineering optimizes sound and feel. 

TaylorMade M2 Hybrid

Our verdict:

For us TaylorMade’s new M1 and M2 hybrid product line seriously simplifies their offering for consumers this year. And the choice between the two hybrids highlights brilliantly which type of golfer each range is aimed at. Our test pro like a lot of good players has a tendency to pull wider body hybrids left of the target, so the TaylorMade M2 hybrid wouldn’t be his preferred choice.

In our eyes M2’s more forgiving and thanks to all the tech and hours of R&D that’s been poured into its design it performed brilliantly. A ball speed 2mph quicker and 8 yards further than the test average, is very impressive. 

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our TaylorMade M2 Rescue review below 

Bottom line:

We really like how TaylorMade have used the white/black cosmetics on the TaylorMade M2 hybrid’s crown so the head matches the driver and fairway. It’s lighter weight shaft (65g compared to the TaylorMade M1’s 80g regular flex) means it’s a bit of a speed machine. Its responsive, forgiving and easy, to launch from the tee, fairway, rough and even a fairway bunker. The question with 4 available lofts is how many long irons should you be replacing? 


Ping G Hybrid: £180

Lofts: 2/17, 3/19, 4/22, 5/26, 6/30
Stock Shaft:
Alta 70, Tour 90 TFC 80H
Adjustable Hosel: No  

Tech:

The Ping G is the first of their hybrids to have “Turbulators” on the crown, which Ping say not only improves aerodynamics but also aids alignment and focus. A thinned out crown means more weight is positioned to improve MOI, while a new carpenter steel face and tiered sole help optimize face flex to increase ball speeds.

Ping G Hybrid

Our verdict:

We can’t say the Ping G hybrid's “Turbulators” helped raise our club speeds to new levels but we’re happy to agree they cleverly helped direct focus onto the ball at address. The Ping G’s real strength is its consistency, and with just 7 yards of carry distance drop off between middle and off centre hits (for Chris Ryan) its got to be said the wide and long head is really stable and efficient.

Ping’s new counter weighted Alta shaft flighted shots higher than average for each tester and span a little more too, meaning the Ping G hybrid would be particularly good for hitting accurate approaches into greens, as the decent is steeper and spin was above average too.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Ping G Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

The Ping G’s wider body is particularly suited to golfers who sweep shots off the deck. We didn’t all love the unconventional groove pattern but we could agree it’s exceptionally easy to hit consistently well. 


TaylorMade M1 Hybrid: £239

Lofts: 2/17, 3/19, 4/21, 5/24
Stock Shaft:
Mitsubishi Kuro Kage TiNi 70HY
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
How much loft change: +/- 1.5 degrees

Tech:

The M1 rescue is TaylorMade’s first ever sliding weight track rescue club, and it has a 27g sliding weight can be positioned to create a draw, fade or neutral bias. 3 degrees of loft adjustability through the hosel adaptor means it’s possible to dial in lofts and gapping to further suit your own game, while an open channel speed pocket improves ball speeds from a larger portion of the club face.  

TaylorMade M1 hybrid

Our verdict:

For decent players selecting a hybrid is much more about gapping between a fairway wood and their irons, so distance is less of a consideration. That said the TaylorMade M1 was virtually inseparable from the other premium (Callaway Apex) narrow body hybrid in our test. Being the only adjustable weight hybrid it does offer shot shaping capabilities which you won’t get with others, which we reckon is particularly useful if you’ve got specific shot bias set up’s in your driver and fairway woods.

With the sliding weight positioned neutrally there’s a lot of mass at the back of the head which created more spin than Callaway’s Apex hybrid which could help flight the TaylorMade M1 hybrid better for some golfers.  

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our TaylorMade M1 rescue review below 

Bottom line:

It wasn’t that long ago TaylorMade snapped up Adams Golf and their hybrid shaping’s clearly made the transition. For us TaylorMade M1 rescues are for golfers that either hit down on their hybrids (like irons) or have a tendency to pull hybrids left of the target. Make no mistake M1 is expensive, but it gives a level of flexibility decent golfers have come to expect.  


Callaway Apex Hybrid: £189

Lofts: 2H/18, 3H/20, 4H/23, 5H/26
Stock Shaft: Kuro Kage Black Hybrid
Adjustable Hosel: No 

The Tech:

Callaway say the design of their Apex hybrid appeals to better players and tour pro’s. A longer blade length means they transition smoothly from a set of irons, while a neutral CG bias provides workability and control that better players desire. A forged cup face and internal standing wave bring hot face tech to the party.

Callaway Apex hybrid

Our verdict:

Comparing the Apex to Callaway’s wide-bodied XR OS hybrid is like comparing apples to oranges, but it highlights perfectly how different both designs are and how important it is to make the right choice. Where wider body hybrids want to spin more and go up in the air the Apex is intent on powering shots forward.

Shots launched off the face lower, and reached a peak height that was the joint lowest on test. With the same loft as many the Callaway Apex hybrid with its internal weighting and general design flights shots in a completely different way, but still managed to carry shots further than the average hybrid in our test.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Callaway Apex Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

We reckon the Callaway Apex hybrid’s penetrating flight is well suited to a strong performance off the tee. To get the max out of it from the fairway you best not have any difficulty flighting shots from the short grass.


Callaway XR OS Hybrid: £149

Lofts: 3/19, 4/22, 5/25, 6/28, 7/31
Stock Shaft: 
Mitsubishi Fubuki AT
Adjustable Hosel: No

The Tech:

The Callaway XR OS hybrid has been designed for extreme forgiveness, high launch, maximum ball speeds and distance. A forged hyper cup face helps maintain high ball speeds no matter where you hit shots on the face. A wider head shape raises MOI performance whilst also boosting confidence. 

Callaway XR 0S hybrid

Our verdict:

How many times have we been told wider body clubs improve MOI and ball speed performance? Well the data we collected with the Callaway XR OS hybrid completely backs up the theory. It’s a wider head and Callaway don’t shy away from it, and thanks to it the OS protected ball speed alongside the very best on test.

The impressive performance didn’t end there either. It was one of the highest launching and flying hybrids which means excellent drop and stop capability on the greens. It was only out done by a handful of yards for top spot when it came to carry distance. 

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Callaway XR OS Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

An excellent hybrid that delivers the extra ball speed and distance that the majority of golfers need at the top end of their bags. Our test pro thought 80% of golfers would be better off with a wide body hybrid like the Callaway XR OS hybrid compared to a narrower bodied alternative.


Mizuno JPX 900 Hybrid: £219

Lofts: 16, 19, 22, 25
Stock Shaft: 
Fujikura Pro
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
How much loft change: +/- 2 degrees

Tech:

The Mizuno JPX 900 is Mizuno’s first adjustable hybrid. A new profile means the head is made like a wood but plays like an iron and is perfect for golfers who have a tendency to pull hybrids left. A shockwave sole locates mass low in the head and its ability to expand and contract at impact creates more energy than a typical hybrid. The adjustable hosel allows up to 4deg of loft change so you can tailor gapping to your own game.

Mizuno JPX 900 hybrid

Our verdict:

If you saw Top Gear 2016 you might have spotted how Mizuno’s woods didn’t feature too heavily amongst our favourites.  And that’s because we thought the EZ range was pretty difficult to heartily recommend. That’s all changed this year as the JPX 900 is simply fantastic, and according to our test pro some of the best woods Mizuno’s ever made.

Yes the Mizuno JPX 900 hybrid is costly but the attention to the smallest details is spot on. We love how the crowns painted finish ends a couple of millimetres back from the top edge making the face look bigger, easier to hit and naturally inspiring confidence. It’s long blade length and compact mid-wide body felt solid and responsive even if it wasn’t quite the very longest on test.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Mizuno JPX 900 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

Across our three man test we reckoned the Mizuno JPX 900 hybrid was a pleasure to hit. With three lofts and the ability to tune the loft up or down by 2deg means the 900 can be fitted into virtually any golfers set.  


Cobra King F7 Hybrid: £159

Lofts: 2-3/16-19, 3-4/19-22, 4-5/22-25
Stock Shaft: 
Fujikura Pro 75
Adjustable Hosel: Yes
How much loft change: 3 degrees (with three draw settings)

Tech:

Refined shaping of the sole Baffler rails improves turf interaction for the Cobra King F7 hybrid say Cobra, giving consistency from any lie. A single fixed sole weight is positioned to deliver a towering ball flight with a perfect blend of distance and forgiveness. A lighter, thinner 455 steel face increases face flex for maximum ball speeds on off centre hits.  

Cobra King F7 Hybrid

Our verdict:

If you’re ever going to get the best out of your hybrids they’ve got to be versatile and offer the opportunity to escape from all sorts of situations. And that’s where the Cobra King F7 hybrid scores stacks of brownie points.

It’s railed sole means only a tiny portion of the bottom of the club is in contact with the turf so we reckon like us other golfers will fancy their chances of hitting the cute little F7 not only from the tee, fairway and rough but also skidding it out of fairway bunkers too.

Our data proves the F7 performed for all three testers, delivering a ball speed 3mph quicker and 5 yards further than the test average.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Cobra King F7 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

The Cobra King F7 is a gorgeous little hybrid and its versatility is only boosted by the ability to dial in three lofts (with draw settings) from the hosel adaptor. The only niggle raised by 2 testers was how the funky face groove pattern distracted the eye at address. If you’re not as fussy as our testers you might not even notice.  


Srixon Z H65 Hybrid: £190

Lofts: 2/16, 3/19, 4,22
Stock Shaft: 
Miyazaki Kaula Hybrid 7
Adjustable Hosel: No

Tech:

Srixon’s engineers have specifically studied how golfers launch hybrids into the air and come up with “optimized CG locations” for the Srixon Z H65 hybrid. Lower and deeper CG’s in the lower lofts promote higher initial launch, while more rounded soles in the higher lofts promote extra shot versatility from any lie. A new “arc support channel” on the crown gets deeper by loft to promote higher launch and optimal spin.

Srixon Z H65 Hybrid

Our verdict:

Our Top Gear test has threw up just how different hybrids really can be, but what about if you want a hybrid that brings everything together in a single model? That’s where the Srixon Z H65 enters the conversation, as it’s a real blend of a mid-wide body performance with the lower spin characteristics of a much narrower head.

Our test pro loved the feel of the Srixon Z H65 hybrid and by carrying all his test shots to within 4 yards of each other we have to say it’s pretty accurate and consistent too. Chris Jones posted his joint longest carry distance average (with the Callaway XR OS) with the H65 which has to say it’s a blend that can work in the club golfers hands as well.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Srixon Z H65 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

Srixon aren’t renowned for their wood designs yet and with the Srixon Z H65 hybrid weighing in at a hefty £190 a pop its unlikely to change with this model. But if your game means you like the look of a wider body hybrid, but you’d benefit from lowering spin, so shots are less likely to “pop up” into the air the Srixon H65 offers a great solution.

For us it’s the only hybrid that successfully brings together the good traits from both narrow and wide body camps in a single model.


Wilson Staff D300 Hybrid: £139

Lofts: 17, 19, 22, 25
Stock Shaft: 
Matrix Speed Rulz A-Type
Adjustable Hosel: No

Tech:

A progressive head design on the Wilson Staff D300 hybrid means the higher lofts have smaller heads so you get maximum forgiveness in the longer shafted lower lofts. Micro vortex generators on the crown reduce drag and improve aerodynamics so you generate maximum carry on every shot.

Wilson Staff D300 Hybrid

Our verdict:

The Wilson Staff D300 hybrid is a book you really shouldn’t judge by its cover. It’s tiny but wide head looks more like a little fairway wood than hybrid, and initially we thought the size could zap confidence from the vey golfers its designed to help. Yet the results it produced were remarkable. Our test pro thought it was the best Wilson club he’d hit throughout the whole of our Top Gear tests.

The Wilson Staff D300 hybrid’s shaft weighs in at just 54g. It’s 28g lighter than some of the competition and much closer to the weight of a standard driver shaft. We felt it gave a really positive responsive feel and meant the D300 racked up a carry distance 3 yards further than the test average.

Best Hybrids 2017: Watch our Wilson Staff D300 Hybrid review below 

Bottom line:

Unlike drivers, golfers are much less likely to buy a hybrid because it generates a few more yards - so your criteria for buying hybrids should be different. If your criteria shortlist includes easy to launch, forgiveness, good distance and ball speed protection then the Wilson Staff D300 hybrid is difficult to beat.


Benross HTX Compressor Hybrid: £89

Lofts: 3/20, 4/23.5, 5/27, 6/32
Stock Shaft: 
Kuro Kage Black 70g
Adjustable Hosel: No

Tech:

Featuring the same Compressor Technology Response Channel as the Benross HTX Compressor and HTX Compressor Type R fairway woods, the HTX Compressor hybrid offers exceptional performance from even the worst lies. The rearward CG position promotes a high launch and helps to maximise stability at impact. 

 

Benross HTX Compressor Hybrid

Our verdict:

With the average cost of a hybrid within our test working out at £153.86, the Benross HTX Compressor represents excellent value for money. It’s a fantastic head shape and great blend of wide body forgiveness all wrapped up in a shell that for lots of club golfers will be a confidence inspiring size.

For two testers though it was the highest spinning hybrid on test, and that spin robbed the HTX Compressor of some value yards of carry distance. In the real world it’s not realistic to expect a club less than half the cost of one of the longest on test to compete. On which basis it should be no surprise the HTX Compressor posted a 4mph slower ball speed and a carry distance 14 yards short of the test average.

Bottom line:

Benross have made some quality golf gear over the years and the Benross HTX Compresor hybrid is still a very good option for club golfers considering the cost. The shaft and grip are great quality, but with major brands spending much more on R&D there seems to be a bit of a gap opening up between premium tour brands and the smaller competition.

To read the rest of our 2017 Hybrid reviews, visit our Top Gear Test Page