The Disney film that shaped DeChambeau's career

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Bryson DeChambeau is a self-confessed “golf scientist” who since making his US PGA Tour debut as an amateur at the FedEx St. Jude Classic in 2015, has developed into one of the world’s leading players.

Now 26 and a five-time PGA Tour winner ranked 13 in the world rankings, DeChambeau has the golfing world at his feet and in the coming years will be reaching out for more glory – particularly on the majors front.

Here, the Trump Golf ambassador reveals his golfing philosophies, hopes and dreams…

You’re involved in education, specifically physics and maths, and you utilise those principles while playing golf. Explain how you apply this to your game?

Education, physics and maths all play a key role in the success I’ve had on the PGA Tour. I was a physics major at Southern Methodist University for over three years. I always had a strong interest in understanding the world around me. I always want to know more and understand why things happen the way they do. I work closely with my caddie, Tim Tucker, in preparation for each event and make sure we leave no stone unturned and try to account for as many variables as possible in the game.

You developed your own set of single-length irons: how did you know this was the right move to make to help elevate your game?

In 2011, my coach Mike Schy and I decided to go down a rabbit hole and try something different. I was always looking to do things my way and not worry about what anyone else had to say. If they worked, that was all that mattered. One day I asked Mike, “Why can’t all the irons be the same length?” Mike responded, “That is an easy question to ask, but a difficult one to answer.” From that point on, we began the journey to prove there is more than just one way to play the game….

What’s been your career highlight so far and why?

There’s no doubt my first win at the 2017 John Deere Classic was extremely special, but I would have to say winning the 2018 Memorial Tournament is the most memorable so far. I did not bring my best from tee-to-green on Sunday, but I was able to scramble really well. I was hoping to two putt and avoid a play-off on the 72nd hole, but we wound up going into a play-off where I relied on my ball striking to give me the best chance to win. Finally, on the second play-off hole, I hit a great second shot into the green and sealed the victory with a 10ft birdie putt. To walk off the 18th green after the playoff and shake Mr. Nicklaus’ hand as the champion of his event was an absolute honour. 

What was it like playing in your first Ryder Cup and representing the US in Paris in 2018?

To me, there is no greater honour than having the opportunity to put on the red, white and blue in competition and represent your country. I had the chance to partner with both Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson that week in Paris. For me to get a chance to partner with two of my childhood idols in a Ryder Cup is something I will never forget. While we did not play our best that week as a team, it was an incredible experience. I look forward to working hard to making the team later this year at Whistling Straits when we will have home crowd advantage.

You’re very close to your father so can you tell us how he has influenced your unique approach to golf?

My father was the first one to ever put a golf club in my hands. I remember at three-years-old riding in the basket of a golf cart watching him play. I am grateful to him for introducing me to the game I love today. My dad supports me in my unique approach to the game and I’ve always been one to do things a bit differently. When I first went to the One Length Irons in 2011, he was a bit sceptical of my coach Mike Schy and me, but he is pretty pleased now how things have turned out! My dad always told me it would never be easy to have success at the highest level, but whenever things got difficult, he would always remind me to “keep swimming.” That simple saying from the movie Finding Nemo has been something I always went back to when I needed to dig deep and pull through during a difficult stretch.

How has your relationship with the Trump Organisation evolved and what does it means to you to represent Trump Golf?

I’m extremely honoured to represent Trump Golf and have the relationship with the Trump Organisation that I have. The entire team is always behind me 100% and I’m grateful for their support.