Best Golf Balls

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What is the best golf ball for your game? From better players to high-handicappers, premium tour balls to balls for beginners, we've identified the perfect models for you.

LIMITED TIME BLACK FRIDAY DEALS!

TaylorMade TP5 Golf Balls | £49.99 £37.95 | VIEW DEAL

Callaway Chrome Soft X Golf Balls | £39.99 £34.95 | VIEW DEAL

TaylorMade Tour Response Golf Balls | £39.99 £29.99 | VIEW DEAL

Volvik Vivid Golf Balls | £39 £29.60 | VIEW DEAL

Honma D1 golf balls (Two dozen) | £29.98 £25.00 | VIEW DEAL

Volvik Vivid Lite Golf Balls | £39 £24.99 | VIEW DEAL

Srixon AD333 Golf Balls | £27 £22.99 | VIEW DEAL

Callaway Supersoft Golf Balls | £22.99 £20.89 | VIEW DEAL

Click a category or ball to jump straight to it. Hit view offer to buy the balls now.

Best Tour golf balls

1. TaylorMade TP5 / TP5x | RRP £49.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

2. Titleist Pro V1 / Pro V1x | RRP £50 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

3. Srixon Z-Star / Z-Star XV | RRP £39.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

4. Callaway Chrome Soft X / Chrome Soft X LS | RRP £39.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

5. Wilson Staff Model / Staff Model R | RRP £44.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

Best Urethane Golf Balls

1. TaylorMade Tour Response | RRP £39.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

2. Callaway Chrome Soft | RRP £39.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

3. Titleist Tour SpeedRRP £40 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

4. Srixon Q-Star Tour | RRP £34.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

Best Non-Urethane Golf Balls

1. Callaway ERC Soft | RRP £40 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

2. Titleist Tour Soft | RRP £33 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

3. TaylorMade Soft Response | RRP £24.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

4. Srixon AD333 | RRP £24 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

5. Wilson Duo Soft+ | RRP £19.99 | VIEW OFFER

View the rest of the best non-urethane golf balls

Best Direct-to-Consumer Golf Balls

1. Vice Pro | RRP £38.28 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

2. Cut DC | RRP £29.95 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

3. Seed The Pro One | RRP £31 per dozen | VIEW OFFER

View the rest of the best direct-to-consumer golf balls

How do I choose the best golf ball for my game?

Choosing the right golf ball can be a minefield. Between them, the five big golf brands (Titleist, TaylorMade, Callaway, Srixon and Wilson) alone have 35 different models to choose between… and that doesn’t include different colour or alignment aid choices.

To the untrained eye, most golf balls promise similar benefits – more speed, more distance, less spin with a driver, more spin with a wedge, along with great feel. Researching them all and testing a few to find one that compliments your game is way beyond the attention span of most club golfers. But after years of testing and fittings, we know that identifying the right ball for your game and handicap can help lower scores. We also know that it can be expensive and that you want the best value golf balls for your money.

Where should you start with choosing a golf ball?

We’ve categorised all the leading balls from each of the main manufacturers (as well as seven direct-to-consumer brands that sell online) so you can clearly see which balls offer similar benefits, plus how to choose between various models when there’s more than one option in a single category. We’ve also included information from our tests to highlight which have performed well for us.

Start by setting yourself a budget, and be honest about how much you can realistically commit to spending on golf balls in a season. The typical club golfer gets through six dozen (72) balls a year and there’s a huge consistency benefit in playing the same ball all of the time.

If your driver swing speed is average (around 93mph) and you’re happy to pay for a premium tour ball, start by looking at our tour balls category.

If you’re willing to pay for a premium ball but your swing speed is around or just nudging the average driver speed, it’s likely a urethane-covered club golfer ball will be a better fit. 

If you swear you don’t see the difference premium balls offer, have a look at the non-urethane balls.

Finally, if you want a performance ball but don’t want to pay what the big brands ask, check the online-only category.

And, if after reading all of this, you still want to continue your research then be sure to read our Robot Golf Balls Test and our guides to the Best Golf Balls for Beginners and High HandicappersBest Premium Golf Balls, Best Ladies' Golf BallsBest Alignment Golf Balls and the Best Winter Golf Balls.

- Just so you know, whilst we may receive a commission or other compensation from the links on this page, we never allow this to influence product selections.

Best Golf Balls for Better Players

Who are tour golf balls for?

Tour golf balls used to be the premium choice for all golfers, but thanks to the launch of balls optimised for average swing speeds, the pressure for club golfers to stump up the money for a full-on tour ball has subsided. We know 93mph is the average driver club speed; at speeds much less than this, tour balls are probably not best optimised to help your game. You can read and watch our premium/tour golf balls test here.

1. TaylorMade TP5 / TaylorMade TP5x

RRP £49.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Five-piece with cast urethane covers | Colours White, Yellow, Pix
Who plays it on Tour? TaylorMade TP5: Collin Morikawa, Matthew Wolff. TaylorMade TP5x: Dustin Johnson, Rory McIlroy, Tommy Fleetwood, Sergio Garcia, Rickie Fowler, Henrik Norlander, Harry Higgs.

The TaylorMade TP5 and TP5x are among the best golf balls.

TaylorMade’s five-layer approach to tour balls gives more knobs and dials to tweak to tailor each ball to its target player. More tour players have switched back to the slightly firmer and faster TP5x for 2021, as there’s such a premium on speed and distance at the moment.

When TaylorMade launched the TP5 in 2017, they spoke about choosing on the feel you prefer, rather than just looking at the comparison numbers between the two balls – it’s solid advice that’s still relevant today. The slightly softer TP5 has a little extra wedge and greenside spin (not full wedge shot spin), while the TP5x flies higher and is slightly longer with the driver and irons. The TP5x was also a very high spinning tour ball on full wedge shots when we tested earlier this year.

How the TaylorMade TP5 and TP5x golf balls differ

  TaylorMade TP5 TaylorMade TP5x
Ball speed Fast Fastest
Iron Distance Long Longest
Launch High Higher
Wedge Spin Highest High


2. Titleist Pro V1 / Titleist Pro V1x

RRP £50 per dozen |  VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Pro V1: Three- piece with cast urethane cover. Pro V1x: Four-piece with cast urethane cover | Colours White, Yellow
Who plays it on Tour? Pro V1: Viktor HovlandHarris EnglishTony FinauDaniel BergerLouis OosthuizenScottie SchefflerPaul CaseyBernd Wiesberger, Patrick Reed, Cameron Smith, Billy Horschel, Webb Simpson. Pro V1x: Patrick CantlayJustin ThomasBrooks KoepkaJordan SpiethTyrrell HattonMatt FitzpatrickLee WestwoodIan Poulter.

The Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x are among the best golf balls.

No matter how hard you look you won’t find any information relating to compression or which club speeds either ball is optimised for. Instead, Titleist prefer to say Pro V1 gives optimal flight and spin for most golfers.

The only other details Titleist are happy to let slip are how the Pro V1 gives lower long- game spin and a more penetrating flight, and less iron spin than the Pro V1x.

In our eyes, we see the Pro V1x as offering a firmer feel and higher ball flight. Our pro’s test data has the Pro V1x down as our second longest driver ball and our third highest spinning for full shots with a wedge. One thing that we would say is that neither of these would be the best golf ball for beginners or higher handicappers, especially in terms of value (£4.16 per ball).

How the Titleist Pro V1 and Pro V1x golf balls differ

  Titleist Pro V1 Titleist Pro V1x
Flight Mid High
Long game spin Very low Low
Iron spin Less More
Short game spin High High

3. Srixon Z-Star / Srixon Z-Star XV

RRP £39.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Z-Star: Three-piece with urethane cover. Z-Star XV: Four-piece with urethane cover | Colours White, Yellow
Who plays it on Tour?: Z-Star: Keegan Bradley. Z-Star XV: Hideki Matsuyama, Shane Lowry, Graeme McDowell, Russell Knox, Martin Laird, JB Holmes.

The Srixon Z-Star and Z-Star XV are among the best golf balls.

If you’re swinging the driver at 90mph+ (93mph is the club golfer average), you should be looking at the Srixon Z-Star golf ball. And as you approach 105mph+, the firmer Z-Star XV (the Z-Star is 90 compression where the Z-Star XV is 102) becomes the better option.

Hideki Matsuyama won the Masters this year with an XV and it's the ball of choice of 2019 Open champion and Ryder cup star Shane Lowry. Our data has it down as a very powerful option – for our test pro it was just a single yard behind the longest Callaway Chrome Soft X LS (combining driver and 7-iron carry distance). But remember, Srixon say you need decent levels of speed to unlock this performance, so it may not be the best golf ball for distance for everyone.

Our test pro’s data for full wedge shots has the XV generating slightly more spin (300rpm), but the softer Z-Star is better at generating spin from areas closer to the green where you can’t take a full swing.

How the Srixon Z-Star and Z-Star XV golf balls differ

  Srixon Z-Star Srixon Z-Star XV
Distance Long Longer
Driver spin Low Low
Launch Mid Mid-High
Greenside Spin Highest High

RELATED: Which Srixon ball is right for me?

4. Callaway Chrome Soft X / Callaway Chrome Soft X LS

RRP £39.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Four-piece with cast urethane covers | Colours White, Yellow, Truvis
Who plays it on Tour?: Chrome Soft X: Jon RahmPhil MickelsonXander Schauffele, Si Woo Kim, Sam Burns, Francesco Molinari, Marc Leishman, Dylan Frittelli, Aaron Wise, Maverick McNealy, Emiliano Grillo.

The Callaway Chrome Soft X and Chrome Soft X LS are among the best golf balls.

After watching both Jon Rahm and Phil Mickelson win Majors with the same Callaway ball and knowing that it was our pro's ball of choice for all of our 2021 clubs tests, it would be easy to plump for the Chrome Soft X. But our testing has shown there’s quite a bit of difference between them.

The lower spinning X LS was our test pro’s longest tour ball with the driver (he swings the driver at 112mph), and it was just a single yard behind the very longest (the Srixon Z-Star and Wilson Staff Model R) with a 7-iron. Add driver and iron performance together and the X LS was 15 yards out in front of the Chrome Soft X, making it one of the best golf balls for distance.

Callaway say that for players to get the best out of either ball you need to swing the driver at 105mph+ (lower speeds should look at the standard Chrome Soft in our urethane cover club golfer category). Think of the X as giving a lower, more penetrating ball flight, and a little more full wedge and greenside spin and you really won’t go too far wrong. The X LS is a brilliant option for high speed players who yearn for extra yards off the tee.

How the Callaway Chrome Soft X and X LS golf balls differ


Callaway Chrome Soft X Chrome Soft X LS
Driver spin Low-Mid Low
Iron launch Mid Mid-High
Greenside spin Highest High
Ball flight Workable Straight

RELATED: All the best Black Friday golf deals

5. Wilson Staff ModelWilson Staff Model R

RRP £44.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Four-piece with urethane covers | Colours White, Raw
Who plays it on Tour? Paul Lawrie, Craig Lee.

The Wilson Staff Model and Staff Model R are among the best golf balls.

After looking at the paint on competitor balls, Wilson found pooling in the dimples, which they say leads to inconsistency. So the Staff Model R (Raw) eliminates the problem as it’s unpainted.

In our opinion it makes perfect sense to play the raw R Model if you can stomach its slightly duller appearance. The unpainted cover also adds a little more wedge spin and flattens out driver and iron flight slightly.

Data from our recent tour balls test showed how both are very good at both ends of the bag. So while they gave up six yards with the driver and 7-iron combined against our very longest, with a wedge the Staff Model and Staff Model R were just 7rpm and 93rpm respectively behind our very highest spinning wedge models.

How the Wilson Staff Model and Staff Model R golf balls differ

  Wilson Staff Model Wilson Staff Model R
Distance Longest Longest
Feel Firm Raw
Flight Mid Low-Mid
Greenside spin High Highest

WATCH OUR PREMIUM GOLF BALLS TEST

Best Urethane Golf Balls for Club Golfers

Who are urethane golf balls for?

This category has grown in popularity over the last couple of years, as ball brands have tailored premium balls (with soft urethane covers) to the game of the club golfer.

If you’re unsure whether you should be looking for a ball within this or the tour level category, be honest about your club speed. If you’re confused between balls in this category and less expensive non-urethane balls, ask yourself if you’re willing to pay for the extra short game performance that a urethane cover delivers. If the answer’s no, there’s plenty of less expensive 2/3-piece non-urethane balls to choose from.

1. TaylorMade Tour Response

RRP £39.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Three-piece with urethane cover | Colours White, Yellow

The TaylorMade Tour Response is one of the best golf balls.

After so much tour success with the TP5 and TP5x. TaylorMade turned their attention to club golfers with the Tour Response in 2020. And from our experience the Tour Response is so good it converted our five-handicap tester to switch out of his favourite TP5 last year.

It offers a softer feel (the Soft Response is even softer, but doesn’t have a urethane cover) than the TP5s without compromising much else (at club golfer speeds). Compared to last year’s Titleist Pro V1, our 5-handicap club golfer was 12 yards longer (using the Tour Response) when combining driver and iron distance, which is significant for lots of club golfers. If you get through six dozen balls a year, you’ll save £60 against the TP5s, too, making it a great value and great performing golf ball.

How the TaylorMade Tour Response compares to TP5 and TP5x

   Tour Response TaylorMade TP5 TaylorMade TP5x
Playability Consistent Workable Piercing
Launch High Mid High
Feel Softest Softer Soft
Wedge spin High Higher High

RELATED: Tested – TaylorMade Tour Response vs Titleist Pro V1

2. Callaway Chrome Soft

RRP £39.99 per dozen VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Four-piece with urethane cover | Colours White, Yellow, Truvis

The Callaway Chrome Soft is one of the best golf balls.

The original Chrome Soft was designed from a very different place to other premium balls. Callaway wanted it to resonate with club golfers, so where the market leaders focused on optimised balls for the driver (which have a firmer compression), Callaway wanted the Chrome Soft to come at ball design from a strokes gained perspective, rather than just driver optimisation.

So where a typical club golfer’s round of 80-85 will include 10-14 drives and 30 putts, there are 20-25 iron and hybrid shots that can be helped through a ball’s design, and that’s where the Chrome Soft foundations lie.

Callaway say most Chrome Soft players should be swinging the driver at less than 100mph. We reckon lots of club golfers will find themselves choosing between this and the slightly cheaper ERC Soft. The ERC Soft’s three-piece construction doesn’t have a urethane cover, but Callaway say it’s their fastest soft ball, which is worth remembering if your game favours a fraction more speed and distance over short game/wedge spin.

How the Callaway Chrome Soft compares to the Chrome Soft X and X LS golf balls

  Callaway Chrome Soft Chrome Soft X Chrome Soft X LS
Feel Soft Medium Medium
Speed Fast Fastest Fastest
Forgiveness Higher/straight Mid-high High/straight
Greenside spin Higher Highest High

3. Titleist Tour Speed

RRP £40 per dozen VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Three-piece with urethane cover | Colours White, Yellow

The Titleist Tour Speed is one of the best golf balls.

With similar packaging and names, it’s easy to get confused between the Tour Speed and Tour Soft, but there are major differences between them. The three-piece urethane-covered Tour Speed is for golfers who put an emphasis on speed and distance, along with excellent overall performance through the bag.

The two-piece Tour Soft doesn’t have a urethane cover and targets a very soft feel at a lower price. If you’re a mid-handicap club golfer who still insists the Pro V1 is right for you, we’d love to know if you can really feel the difference between the pair, especially when the Tour Speed will save you money.

Rob Jerram, Today's Golfer's digital editor, is off 12 and has played both the Pro V1 and Tour Speed balls across the summer and noticed very little difference in performance between the two.

How the Titleist Tour Speed compares to Pro V1 and Tour Soft

  Titleist Pro V1 Titleist Tour Speed Titleist Tour Soft
Flight Mid Mid Mid
Feel Soft Soft Very Soft
Long game spin Mid Low Low
Short game spin High Mid Mid

 

4. Srixon Q-Star Tour / Srixon Q-Star Tour Divide

RRP £34.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Three-piece with urethane covers | Colours Q-Star Tour: White, Yellow. Tour Divide: Yellow/Orange, Yellow/Red, Yellow/Blue

The Srixon Q-Star Tour and Tour Divide are among the best golf balls.

With a compression of 72, the Q-Star Tour delivers the softer feel that lots of club golfers like – by comparison, Srixon’s legendary AD333 has a compression of 77.

It’s 20% softer than the Z-Star and Srixon say it works best for 75mph+ driver swing speeds. Expect higher greenside spin than Srixon’s Soft Feel and UltiSoft, and similar levels to the AD333.

In reality, lots of club golfers will be split between this model and the AD333. There’s £10.99 a dozen difference (£65.94 if you buy six dozen a season), but even though the construction and cover materials are different, the choice really comes down to whether you prefer a slightly softer (Q-Star Tour) or firmer feel (AD333).

At a time when golf balls are going alignment crazy, if your game fits the Q-Star Tour outline then you really should look at the new Q-Star Tour Divide, too, where the urethane cover is split into two different colours so you can see it spin and align putts more easily.

How the Srixon Q-Star Tour compares to the AD333 golf ball

  Srixon Q-Star Tour Srixon AD333
Compression 72 77
Swing speed 75mph+ 75mph+
Launch Mid-high Mid-high
Greenside spin High High

 

WATCH OUR ROBOT GOLF BALLS TEST

Best Non-Urethane Golf Balls for Club Golfers

Who are non-urethane golf balls for?

Many club golfers argue that they don’t see any performance gain by investing in an expensive urethane ball played on tour, and that’s just fine. It’s exactly why ball brands offer these options, too, which many golfers consider the best value gold balls. Wilson say more than 60% of their ball sales come within this category, so there are vast sums of money spent by golfers every season, which also means there’s plenty of choice to tailor a golf ball down to your feel and performance preferences.

1. Callaway ERC Soft

 RRP £36.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Three-piece, hybrid blend cover | Colours White, Yellow

The Callaway ERC Soft is one of the best golf balls.

The ERC Soft, Callaway's longest soft golf ball, is very much a modern hybrid ball. Its three-piece construction is rare in this category, but by creating a hybrid blend cover it targets the all-round performance traits of soft feel, great speed and decent levels of spin for reasonable money (£3.08 per ball).

Plus it has the brilliant Triple Track alignment lines, which making lining up putts an absolute doddle. It is a great option and one of the best golf balls for mid handicappers.

2. Titleist Tour Soft

RRP £33 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Two-piece with ionomer blend cover | Colours White, Yellow

The Titleist Tour Soft is one of the best golf balls.

The Tour Soft (£2.75 a ball) is for golfers who want the softest feel from a high performance golf ball.

It has Titleist's largest-ever core which, in turn, means an extremely thin cover that helps to increase short game spin and feel. It's impressively long and fast off the tee thanks in part to the spherically-tiled 342 cuboctahedron dimple design and, as with Tour Speed, the Tour Soft has the sidestamp design to help you align putts on the greens.

If you're a moderate swing speed player seeking distance then you may be better off with Velocity (£2.33 per ball), or if it's all about soft feel for you then TruFeel (£1.92 per ball), Titleist's softest golf ball, could be a better option.

  Titleist Tour Soft Titleist Velocity Titleist TruFeel
Flight Mid High Low
Feel Very soft Soft Very soft
Long game spin Low Low Low
Short game spin Mid Low Low

 

3. TaylorMade Soft Response

RRP £24.99 VIEW OFFER
Construction Three-piece with ionomer cover | Colours White, Yellow, Pink

The TaylorMade Soft Response is one of the best golf balls.

The Soft Response is a rare three-piece model (with Callaway’s ERC Soft) in what for many is a ‘value’ category.  The name gives a big clue as to who the Soft Response targets; players who like the feel of a very soft ball.

TaylorMade say it’s pretty common practice for club fitters to match lower speed players with higher lofted drivers as the extra spin helps shots stay in the air for longer, and the Soft Response does the same thing through golf ball design. It's unique dimple pattern aids distance and we've found it to be impressively long with a consistent flight off the tee.

It doesn't spin as much as urethane models such as the Tour Response, but it feels soft off the face and at £2.08 per ball we think the TaylorMade Soft Response is one of the best golf balls for mid handicappers.

How the TaylorMade Tour Response compares to the Soft Response and Distance+ golf balls

  Tour Response Soft Response Distance+
Distance Longer Long Max
Speed Faster Fast Faster
Wedge spin High Mid Mid-high
Feel Soft Softer Soft

 

4. Srixon AD33

RRP £24 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Two-piece with ionomer cover | Colours White, Yellow

The Srixon AD333 is one of the best golf balls, offers great value and is ideal for beginners to mid-handicappers.

The AD333 has been held up as an excellent all-round value proposition for club golfers since hitting the market in 2006 and Srixon launched the ball's 10th generation in Summer 2021.

It uses a lot of the tech you'll find in the brand's premium Z-Star balls and gives more distance and forgiveness than previous versions thanks to a slight reduction in compression and reformulated FastLayer Core.

The 72 compression is a good fit for golfers swinging over 75mph and gives good levels of greenside spin thanks to a unique flexible molecular bond coating on each ball, digs deep into wedge and iron grooves to maximise spin for more control and more stopping power.

The core is soft in the centre and firmer round its outer edge, working in tandem with Srixon's unique 338 Speed Dimple Pattern to reduce drag and promote a more penetrating flight.

For the price we don't think there are many better golf balls for mid and high handicappers.

If you're seeking something softer then consider the Srixon Ultisoft or Srixon Soft Feel.

  Srixon AD333 Srixon UltiSoft Srixon Soft Feel
Compression 77 42 60
Swing speed 75mph+ All All
Launch Mid-high High High
Greenside spin High Mid Mid

 

5. Wilson Duo Soft+

RRP £19.99 per dozen VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Two-piece with ionomer cover | Colours White

The Wilson Duo Soft+ is one of the best golf balls, offers great value and is ideal for beginners and high-handicappers.

With more than 60% of Wilson’s golf ball sales coming from mid-handicap and high-handicap golfers, it’s no surprise they’ve put a ton of effort into optimising a ball for this particular market. Wilson say that in every test they’ve ever run there’s always 65-75% of golfers that prefer a softer feeling ball.

So the Duo Soft+ (35 compression) is optimised with a very soft but energetic core, under a firmer cover, to be the softest feeling golf ball on the market. Wilson’s ball guru Frank Simonutti also says club golfers need to be
in the fairway to score, so the Duo Soft+ ball targets low spin, as this gives a straighter flight.

At £19.99 a dozen the Duo Soft+ is brilliant in the hands of club golfers who don’t see the benefit in paying more for a urethane ball. One of the best balls value golf balls and perfect for beginners and high handicappers.

6. Callaway Supersoft / Callaway Supersoft Max

RRP £22.99 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Two-piece, hybrid blend cover | Colours White, Gloss Yellow, Matte Red, Matte Green, Matte Pink, Matte Orange

The Callaway Supersoft and Supersoft Max are among the best golf balls for amateur players and beginners.

At £22.99 per dozen (£1.92 a ball), it’s not surprising the Supersoft is Callaway’s most popular ball and one of the most played golf balls among mid-high handicappers. It’s a great option for average club golfers who lose too many and don’t want to spend a fortune on balls. Thanks to its high launch tendencies, the Supersoft is a very good choice for maximising distance at moderate speeds.

And if you find the look of a larger ball inspires extra confidence, the oversized (but still legal) Supersoft Max is the ball for you. Personally we think it's one of the best golf balls for beginners and higher handicappers and we love the array of colour options.

7. Titleist Velocity

RRP £28 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Two-piece with ionomer blend cover | Colours White, Matte Green, Matte Orange, Matte Pink

The Titleist Velocity is one of the best golf balls for amateur players and beginners.

The Velocity (£2.33) is for those who like the idea of hitting shots higher to hit them further.

TruFeel, as Titleist’s softest ball, targets golfers who above all else want the softest feel. We like the idea for moderate speed players that the higher flighted Velocity can help add distance, but you have to be aware that with this and the TruFeel you are trading short game control for either a higher flight or super-soft feel.

How the Titleist Tour Soft, Velocity and TruFeel differ

  Titleist Tour Soft Titleist Velocity Titleist TruFeel
Flight Mid High Low
Feel Very soft Soft Very soft
Long game spin Low Low Low
Short game spin Mid Low Low

 

8. Srixon UltiSoft

RRP £25 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Two-piece with ionomer cover | Colours White, Yellow

The Srixon UltiSoft is one of the best golf balls for amateur players.

There’s been a big shift towards softer, lower compression balls over recent years, so much so that every brand now has at least one model in their range.

Srixon always relied on the the AD333 in this non-urethane category but, thanks to golfers seeking out softer options, they now have two other models within this category.

The UltiSoft is a good match for golfers who prioritise soft feel, but also especially good for moderate, steady swing speeds and players who often struggle to flight shots high enough to max out their distance potential. This isn't the ball for player who really like to go after their shots and smash drives and the ultra-low compression core helps keep dispersion nice and tight.

It's marginally more expensive than the AD333 but an excellent option for mid and high handicap golfers and impressively durable so you won't need to change it as often.

  Srixon AD333 Srixon UltiSoft Srixon Soft Feel
Compression 77 42 60
Swing speed 75mph+ All All
Launch Mid-high High High
Greenside spin High Mid Mid

 

9. Srixon Soft Feel

RRP £25 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Two-piece with ionomer cover | Colours White, Yellow

The Srixon Soft Feel is one of the best golf balls for amateur players.

We think fo the Soft Feel as a version of the AD333, only you give up a little greenside spin in exchange for a softer feel.

Now in its 12th generation it provides, unsurprisingly, a lovely soft feel off the club face thanks to its 60 compression, gives good control around the greens and is impressively long off the tee. 

The 338 Speed Dimple Pattern helps to produce a nice stable flight and it launches at nice mid height through the bag.

The new black alignment line helps you with accuracy on the greens. It's a great and reliable option for most mid and high handicap golfers and good value, too.

How the Srixon AD333 compares to the UltiSoft and Soft Feel Golf Balls

  Srixon AD333 Srixon UltiSoft Srixon Soft Feel
Compression 77 42 60
Swing speed 75mph+ All All
Launch Mid-high High High
Greenside spin High Mid Mid

 

10. Titleist TruFeel

RRP £23 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction
 Two-piece with ionomer blend cover | Colours White, Yellow, Matte Red

The Titleist TruFeel is one of the best golf balls for mid-handicap to high-handicap club golfers.

TruFeel is a very soft golf ball, so you shouldn't expect loads of short game control but you should expect a great value golf ball.

A reformulated core has helped to increase driver ball speed while also keeping spin low to help maximise the distance through a lower flight than balls such as the Tour Soft or Pro V1.

 There have also been changes to the the dimples to further increase long game distance and it performs well through the middle of the bag, while the cover is impressively durable. Titleist have added a new sidestamp design, previously only a custom option, to assist with alignment on the greens, and the traditional model has a brighter white finish than the Pro V1 and Pro V1x, which makes it appear larger - a welcome confidence booster for higher-handicap players.

  Titleist Tour Soft Titleist Velocity Titleist TruFeel
Flight Mid High Low
Feel Very soft Soft Very soft
Long game spin Low Low Low
Short game spin Mid Low Low

 

11. TaylorMade Distance+

RRP £18.99 | VIEW OFFER
Construction Two-piece with ionomer cover | Colours White, Yellow

The TaylorMade Distance+ is one of the best golf balls for beginners and high-handicap club golfers.

The Distance+ is new for 2021 and, as the name suggests, it is a distance golf ball, providing a mid-height launch.

The React Speed Core and 342 Aerodynamic Dimple Pattern help increase the ball's carry distance and, with 77 compression, you can expect a soft feel and mid-high wedge spin.

As an added bonus it features a brilliant cross hairs alignment side stamp to help you on the greens. At £18.99 a dozen (£1.58 a ball) it’s one of the best value golf balls available, as well as being one of the best golf balls for distance and for high handicappers.

How the TaylorMade Tour Response compares to the Soft Response and Distance+ golf balls

  Tour Response Soft Response Distance+
Distance Longer Long Max
Speed Faster Fast Faster
Wedge spin High Mid Mid-high
Feel Soft Softer Soft

 

Best Direct to Consumer/Mail Order Golf Balls

Who are direct-to-consumer golf balls for?

Direct-to-consumer brands target golfers who want to get the best value golf balls for their money. Snell and Vice started the trend, spotting the opportunity to sell balls direct to golfers online – cutting out a retailer’s margin and tour player endorsement – and since then plenty of new names have entered the sector. You'll find the best value comes in these brands' premium offerings which undercut the mainstream brands, meaning you could be playing a ball that rivals the Pro V1, TP5, Z-Star or Chrome Soft at a much lower price per dozen.

Only a select few of the online brands produce the cheaper, non-urethane balls as these are much harder for them to shift with the price of big brand models already pretty low. Plus you have to factor in shipping costs for online purchases too.

1. Vice Pro / Vice Pro PLUS / Vice Pro Soft

RRP £38.28 per dozen VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Pro: Four-piece, urethane cover. Pro Plus and Pro Soft: Three-piece, urethane covers | Colours White, neon

The Vice Pro, Pro Plus and Pro Soft are among the best golf balls and ideal for club golfers who want a good value premium ball.

We’ve tested Vice balls a number of times and they’ve always been a really solid option. In fact, last year the Pro Plus was our test pro’s highest spinning wedge ball when we put it up against the Seed, Cut and both Titleist tour balls.

The Pro Plus produces a lower launch and less spin – think of its 95 compression as giving a firmer feel and piercing ball flight to high swing speed players (that’s 110mph+ with the driver).

The 90 compression Pro is optimised for players with 95-110mph swing speeds, while the excellent Pro Soft is tuned for speeds under 95mph.

On the surface, Vice balls have rocketed in price from £29.88 a dozen last year to £38.28 in 2021. But dig a little a deeper and you realise the increase is a great way of getting golfers to buy more. If you can afford to buy six dozen at a time, prices drop back to £29.88 for 12.

RELATED: Tested – Vice Pro vs Titleist Pro V1

2. Cut DC / Cut Blue / Cut Grey

RRP DC £29.95 per dozen. Blue and Grey £19.95 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Cut DC and Cut Blue: Four-piece, urethane covers. Cut Grey: Three-piece, urethane cover. | Colours White

The Cut DC, Cut Blue and Cut Grey are among the best golf balls for club golfers.

Cut have come out of nowhere over the last four years, but we like how they’re available in the UK with a flat shipping rate of £2.90, no matter how many you order.

The DC was our test pro’s longest driver ball in our mail order balls test last year. The Cut Blue also came up smelling of roses (the longest ball) for distance with a 7-iron.

Cut say the 105 compression, four-piece Dual Core DC has been designed for all golfers, if you like the firmer feel. The 90 compression Blue helps lower ball flight, while the 80 compression Grey specifically targets more moderate speed players.

From our experience, the covers of Cut golf balls are a little less durable and more prone to scuffing up than some models.

3. Seed: The Pro One / Seed: The Pro One Tour / Seed: The Pro Soft

RRP £31 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction The Pro One Tour: Four-piece with cast urethane cover. The Pro One and The Pro Soft: Three-piece with cast urethane covers | Colours Pro One: White, Yellow. Pro One Tour/Pro Soft: White 

Seed are among the best golf balls for amateur club players and offer great value.

Seed insist a good majority of their customers buy on delivery plans, where you can opt to have a dozen arriving at your door every few months, as the prices then drop to £22 a dozen, including shipping.

Choosing a model is really simple; the Pro Tour is aimed at being a credible alternative to premium, big brand X-style tour balls; The Pro One targets the Titleist Pro V1 and TaylorMade TP5; while the lower compression Pro Soft is a valid Callaway Chrome Soft alternative.

The Pro One and Pro Tour were our test pro’s second longest driver and second highest wedge spin balls respectively when we tested them against Vice, Cut and Titleist’s Pro V1 and Pro V1x last year.

RELATED: Tested – Seed vs Titleist Pro V1

4. Snell MTB X / Snell MTB Black

RRP £31 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction Three-piece with cast urethane covers. | Colours White, Yellow

Snell MTB X and MTB Black are among the best golf balls for amateur club players and offer great value.

Snell’s founder, Dean Snell, worked on the original Pro V1 and developed TaylorMade’s first tour ball, so your game’s in safe hands buying into his brand.

Both balls are three-piece and while the MTB Black is a little softer (with a compression of 75-80), the MTB X offers a little extra iron spin and a slightly firmer feel (thanks to a 85-90 compression). The MTB X picked up an award for best mail order ball in our 2019 robot test and they remain, in our view, one of the best value golf balls.

5. The Sugar Golf Ball 

RRP £69 for 27 (£2.56 a ball) | VIEW OFFER
Construction Three-piece with urethane cover | Colours White

The Sugar Golf Ball is among the best golf balls for amateur club players and offers great value.

Sugar was born out of two golfers, Bill and Chip, always reaching for old or cheaper balls when they reached a dangerous hole because they couldn't afford to risk losing a premium ball. They make one premium three-piece urethane covered ball, delivered direct to your door (prices include shipping) in 27-ball 'sugar cubes'. There are smaller trial packs available if you don't want to commit before you've hit them.

Sugar say the ball is manufactured to maximise your control and feel, all without sacrificing distance. We see them as a decent value for money option for around and just above average swing speed players.

6. The Sounder Golf Ball

RRP £30 per dozen | VIEW OFFER
Golf ball construction
Three-piece with urethane covering | Colours White

The Sounder Golf Ball is among the best golf balls for amateur club players and offers great value.

Sounder make one ball, a three-piece urethane offering that they say does away with the marketing you get around balls from major brands. To cut down on packaging, Sounder don’t come in individual sleeves or boxes, either, arriving
in organic cotton bags.

At £30 a dozen (£2.50 a ball) or £72 for three dozen, they’re honestly priced and Sounder say the ball plays just as well as, if not better than any direct-to-consumer ball on the market. It’s worth remembering that lots of online-only balls are made in the same Far Eastern factories, with each company tweaking the mixes of their core, mantle and covers to give a very slightly different product.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Simon Daddow is Today's Golfer equipment editor.

Simon Daddow is the Equipment Editor at todaysgolfer.co.uk
Simon has worked in the golf industry for 30 years. Starting out as trainee professional at Downes Crediton GC where he learned the art of golf club making, before going onto work for Clubhaus Plc and Tony Charles Ltd as a golf club maker, and running Product Development at Benross Golf.
Joining EMAP Active (now Bauer Media) in 2006 as Equipment Editor Simon has worked for Today’s Golfer and Golf World magazines and the Today’s Golfer website.
Simon is 46 years old, he’s played golf for 40 years and plays to a handicap of 10. A lack of club speed means he’s short off the tee, but very handy from 125 yards and in.

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